Discussion:
Stuck Delta Faucet Handle
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John Keiser
2006-08-31 02:58:25 UTC
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The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Thank you.
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Speedy Jim
2006-08-31 13:33:54 UTC
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Post by John Keiser
The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Thank you.
Heat with torch. Wear safety glasses!!
mm
2006-08-31 16:55:52 UTC
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On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:58:25 -1000, "John Keiser"
Post by John Keiser
The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Thank you.
You don't have to remove the handle to work on the faucet, if you can
reomve the big ring nut right under the handle. Which is the next
step after removing the handle anyhow.

A rubber self-tightening strap wrench would be good for removing the
big round nut. Wouldn't scratch, and they've been selling those
things even at dollar stores in the last 3 or 4 years. Otherwise
water pump pliers and something inside the jaws to protect the chrome.

And yes, sometimes the "seat" will stick on something and cause the
handle to not move. The problem then is either the seat (replace both
seats and springs) or the ball. If the ball needs replacing, then and
only then you have to remove the handle, but at least you won't be
bending over the sink. Try liquid wrench I suppose. They suggest
tapping or hitting the item so that it vibrates and the liquid wrench
works its way inside. Heating is good if it doesn't hurt the chrome
- about that I don't know.
John Keiser
2006-08-31 18:30:43 UTC
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This model conceals the big ring nut under a chrome cover which needs to be
removed after the handle. :(

I might try the torch when I am prepared to sacrifice the handle as I also
wonder about the chrome finish surviving the heat.

Thanks for the comments.
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David Martel
2006-09-01 00:25:28 UTC
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John,

I just had this problem with a delta faucet. Drill out the set screw.

Dave M.
SRJ
2014-08-24 20:44:01 UTC
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Post by mm
On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:58:25 -1000, "John Keiser"
You don't have to remove the handle to work on the faucet, if you can
reomve the big ring nut right under the handle. Which is the next
step after removing the handle anyhow.
A rubber self-tightening strap wrench would be good for removing the
big round nut. Wouldn't scratch, and they've been selling those
things even at dollar stores in the last 3 or 4 years. Otherwise
water pump pliers and something inside the jaws to protect the chrome.
And yes, sometimes the "seat" will stick on something and cause the
handle to not move. The problem then is either the seat (replace both
seats and springs) or the ball. If the ball needs replacing, then and
only then you have to remove the handle, but at least you won't be
bending over the sink. Try liquid wrench I suppose. They suggest
tapping or hitting the item so that it vibrates and the liquid wrench
works its way inside. Heating is good if it doesn't hurt the chrome
- about that I don't know.
Read your post just in time...I was trying to replace the springs and
seats by removing the set screw which was stuck. Instead I just loosened
the ring under the handle which, thankfully, I was able to turn by hand.
After that, no problems!

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DB
2017-01-04 17:14:01 UTC
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replying to mm, DB wrote:
Thanks for the post! Out set screw was stuck, was about to use a torch but
was not sure if that was going to ruin the handle, was also thinking about
drilling out the screw but then would have to find a compatible handle.

Read this post - then used a dish towel and wrench and easily losened the big
round nut, then the handle and ball came right off! After replacing the
gaskets and springs we tighened the nut down by hand and then used the dish
towel and wrench to tighten it down slowly until it was all the way down
(flush). No more drip drip drip! Thanks!
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Retirednoguilt
2017-01-05 14:47:30 UTC
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replying to mm, DB wrote: Thanks for the post! Out set screw was
stuck, was about to use a torch but was not sure if that was going to
ruin the handle, was also thinking about drilling out the screw but
then would have to find a compatible handle. Read this post - then
used a dish towel and wrench and easily losened the big round nut,
then the handle and ball came right off! After replacing the gaskets
and springs we tighened the nut down by hand and then used the dish
towel and wrench to tighten it down slowly until it was all the way
down (flush). No more drip drip drip! Thanks!
Just yesterday I had almost the same problem, a frozen screw that holds
the handle onto the cartridge on a two handled Delta kitchen faucet.
The screw had a one piece Phillips head and washer. I don't know if the
problem was between the under surface of the washer and the inset in the
handle or between the threads of the screw and the threaded hole in the
top of the cartridge but the screw would not move. After an unsuccessful
soak with WD40, and brute strength with long nose pliers across the
edges of the washer, I put a 1/4" drill bit on my electric drill and
ground away the screw head to where the crossed slots were just barely
visible. I changed to a 3/8" drill bit and carefully started drilling
deeper to grind away some of the thickness of the central 2/3 of the
washer. Using a normal width (3/16") screwdriver, I carefully tried to
pry up the periphery of the washer all around the circumference of the
washer. I again put the long nose pliers across the washer and voila,
it turned easily. Don't know if the vibration of the drilling did it,
the WD40 finally penetrated and loosened whatever was stuck, or if I
really got better purchase on the edge of the washer with the pliers.
In any case, problem solved. I easily found a replacement set screw in
my jar of spare machine screws. Replacing the spring and rubber valve
seat ($2.49 at HD) and cleaning a small deposit of crud off the polished
metal bottom of the cartridge cured the drip.
DerbyDad03
2017-01-05 15:24:23 UTC
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Post by Retirednoguilt
replying to mm, DB wrote: Thanks for the post! Out set screw was
stuck, was about to use a torch but was not sure if that was going to
ruin the handle, was also thinking about drilling out the screw but
then would have to find a compatible handle. Read this post - then
used a dish towel and wrench and easily losened the big round nut,
then the handle and ball came right off! After replacing the gaskets
and springs we tighened the nut down by hand and then used the dish
towel and wrench to tighten it down slowly until it was all the way
down (flush). No more drip drip drip! Thanks!
Just yesterday I had almost the same problem, a frozen screw that holds
the handle onto the cartridge on a two handled Delta kitchen faucet.
The screw had a one piece Phillips head and washer. I don't know if the
problem was between the under surface of the washer and the inset in the
handle or between the threads of the screw and the threaded hole in the
top of the cartridge but the screw would not move. After an unsuccessful
soak with WD40, and brute strength with long nose pliers across the
edges of the washer, I put a 1/4" drill bit on my electric drill and
ground away the screw head to where the crossed slots were just barely
visible. I changed to a 3/8" drill bit and carefully started drilling
deeper to grind away some of the thickness of the central 2/3 of the
washer. Using a normal width (3/16") screwdriver, I carefully tried to
pry up the periphery of the washer all around the circumference of the
washer. I again put the long nose pliers across the washer and voila,
it turned easily. Don't know if the vibration of the drilling did it,
the WD40 finally penetrated and loosened whatever was stuck, or if I
really got better purchase on the edge of the washer with the pliers.
In any case, problem solved. I easily found a replacement set screw in
my jar of spare machine screws. Replacing the spring and rubber valve
seat ($2.49 at HD) and cleaning a small deposit of crud off the polished
metal bottom of the cartridge cured the drip.
It always amazes me how often people immediately jump to WD-40.

Why would you think that a stuck screw in a faucet would be freed up
with WD-40?

If it was rusted in place, I'd try a penetrating catalyst such as
PB-Blaster. If it was stuck due to mineral deposits, I'd use vinegar.

It does not surprise me at all that the WD-40 "soak" was unsuccessful.
I'll put my money on the "vibration" from all your other efforts eventually
breaking the bond. The WD-40 may have "lubed" things up once the bond was
broken, but I doubt it was main reason that you got the screw out.
Uncle Monster
2017-01-06 08:39:51 UTC
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Post by DerbyDad03
Post by Retirednoguilt
replying to mm, DB wrote: Thanks for the post! Out set screw was
stuck, was about to use a torch but was not sure if that was going to
ruin the handle, was also thinking about drilling out the screw but
then would have to find a compatible handle. Read this post - then
used a dish towel and wrench and easily losened the big round nut,
then the handle and ball came right off! After replacing the gaskets
and springs we tighened the nut down by hand and then used the dish
towel and wrench to tighten it down slowly until it was all the way
down (flush). No more drip drip drip! Thanks!
Just yesterday I had almost the same problem, a frozen screw that holds
the handle onto the cartridge on a two handled Delta kitchen faucet.
The screw had a one piece Phillips head and washer. I don't know if the
problem was between the under surface of the washer and the inset in the
handle or between the threads of the screw and the threaded hole in the
top of the cartridge but the screw would not move. After an unsuccessful
soak with WD40, and brute strength with long nose pliers across the
edges of the washer, I put a 1/4" drill bit on my electric drill and
ground away the screw head to where the crossed slots were just barely
visible. I changed to a 3/8" drill bit and carefully started drilling
deeper to grind away some of the thickness of the central 2/3 of the
washer. Using a normal width (3/16") screwdriver, I carefully tried to
pry up the periphery of the washer all around the circumference of the
washer. I again put the long nose pliers across the washer and voila,
it turned easily. Don't know if the vibration of the drilling did it,
the WD40 finally penetrated and loosened whatever was stuck, or if I
really got better purchase on the edge of the washer with the pliers.
In any case, problem solved. I easily found a replacement set screw in
my jar of spare machine screws. Replacing the spring and rubber valve
seat ($2.49 at HD) and cleaning a small deposit of crud off the polished
metal bottom of the cartridge cured the drip.
It always amazes me how often people immediately jump to WD-40.
Why would you think that a stuck screw in a faucet would be freed up
with WD-40?
If it was rusted in place, I'd try a penetrating catalyst such as
PB-Blaster. If it was stuck due to mineral deposits, I'd use vinegar.
It does not surprise me at all that the WD-40 "soak" was unsuccessful.
I'll put my money on the "vibration" from all your other efforts eventually
breaking the bond. The WD-40 may have "lubed" things up once the bond was
broken, but I doubt it was main reason that you got the screw out.
I was introduced to Liquid Wrench when I was a kid. I discovered that not only would it loosen stuck parts and fasteners, it would also run a lawnmower engine. That was the old formula and I'm sure it's been changed to mollify the feds but it worked the last time I tried it. I would warm a part first with either a torch or heat gun(hairdryer) then apply the Liquid Wrench. It would penetrate a stuck part or screw much better that way. ヽ(•‿•)ノ

http://liquidwrench.com/

[8~{} Uncle Wrenching Monster
DerbyDad03
2017-01-06 11:45:42 UTC
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Post by Uncle Monster
Post by DerbyDad03
Post by Retirednoguilt
replying to mm, DB wrote: Thanks for the post! Out set screw was
stuck, was about to use a torch but was not sure if that was going to
ruin the handle, was also thinking about drilling out the screw but
then would have to find a compatible handle. Read this post - then
used a dish towel and wrench and easily losened the big round nut,
then the handle and ball came right off! After replacing the gaskets
and springs we tighened the nut down by hand and then used the dish
towel and wrench to tighten it down slowly until it was all the way
down (flush). No more drip drip drip! Thanks!
Just yesterday I had almost the same problem, a frozen screw that holds
the handle onto the cartridge on a two handled Delta kitchen faucet.
The screw had a one piece Phillips head and washer. I don't know if the
problem was between the under surface of the washer and the inset in the
handle or between the threads of the screw and the threaded hole in the
top of the cartridge but the screw would not move. After an unsuccessful
soak with WD40, and brute strength with long nose pliers across the
edges of the washer, I put a 1/4" drill bit on my electric drill and
ground away the screw head to where the crossed slots were just barely
visible. I changed to a 3/8" drill bit and carefully started drilling
deeper to grind away some of the thickness of the central 2/3 of the
washer. Using a normal width (3/16") screwdriver, I carefully tried to
pry up the periphery of the washer all around the circumference of the
washer. I again put the long nose pliers across the washer and voila,
it turned easily. Don't know if the vibration of the drilling did it,
the WD40 finally penetrated and loosened whatever was stuck, or if I
really got better purchase on the edge of the washer with the pliers.
In any case, problem solved. I easily found a replacement set screw in
my jar of spare machine screws. Replacing the spring and rubber valve
seat ($2.49 at HD) and cleaning a small deposit of crud off the polished
metal bottom of the cartridge cured the drip.
It always amazes me how often people immediately jump to WD-40.
Why would you think that a stuck screw in a faucet would be freed up
with WD-40?
If it was rusted in place, I'd try a penetrating catalyst such as
PB-Blaster. If it was stuck due to mineral deposits, I'd use vinegar.
It does not surprise me at all that the WD-40 "soak" was unsuccessful.
I'll put my money on the "vibration" from all your other efforts eventually
breaking the bond. The WD-40 may have "lubed" things up once the bond was
broken, but I doubt it was main reason that you got the screw out.
I was introduced to Liquid Wrench when I was a kid. I discovered that not only would it loosen stuck parts and fasteners, it would also run a lawnmower engine. That was the old formula and I'm sure it's been changed to mollify the feds but it worked the last time I tried it. I would warm a part first with either a torch or heat gun(hairdryer) then apply the Liquid Wrench. It would penetrate a stuck part or screw much better that way. ヽ(•‿•)ノ
http://liquidwrench.com/
[8~{} Uncle Wrenching Monster
Liquid Wrench is a penetrating catalyst similar to PB-Blaster. The PB-Blaster name is
more fun.

Cousin Silly Monster

MLD
2006-08-31 19:19:02 UTC
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Post by John Keiser
The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Thank you.
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Before you do anything destructive give Delta a call. They are very helpful
and in many cases not only will they give instructions but will supply the
replacement parts at no cost.
MLD
mm
2006-09-01 02:51:45 UTC
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On Wed, 30 Aug 2006 16:58:25 -1000, "John Keiser"
Post by John Keiser
The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Byetw, when you can't loosen a screw, try tightening it. Sometimes
that frees it up.

This would also be a good time to have a left-handed drill bit, for
driling the thing out, going counter clockwise. A good chance it
would start to unscrew at a certain point, with enough thread in the
hole to just use a new set scgrwe.

Harbor Freight now has a set of 4 LH drill bits, at a Chinese price.

And Vermont American has 2 or 3 sizes. The small one(s) is/are cheap.
Post by John Keiser
Thank you.
John Keiser
2006-09-01 03:50:38 UTC
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No Harbor Freight near me [in Hawaii] and shipping is usually an insult.
The LH drills are on my list of fun stuff to buy next time I'm in Manila.
:)
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Jeff Wisnia
2006-09-01 23:42:52 UTC
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Post by John Keiser
No Harbor Freight near me [in Hawaii] and shipping is usually an insult.
The LH drills are on my list of fun stuff to buy next time I'm in Manila.
:)
You can sharpen a RH drill bit so that it will cut when turning CCW.

You'll have to pull it out of the hole frequently to clear the chips,
but it's worth a try for your one time application, providing that allen
head screw isn't too hard.

And when done, you can jusr resharpen it back to being a RH drill <G>.

Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
"Rudeness is the weak man's imitation of strength."
bob haller
2014-08-25 20:15:15 UTC
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Post by John Keiser
No Harbor Freight near me [in Hawaii] and shipping is usually an insult.
The LH drills are on my list of fun stuff to buy next time I'm in Manila.
:)
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I worked at a brand new harbor freight, the set up crew believes they will be getting a new store in hawaii soon:)

I quit because my bad knee was too painful. Nice co workers, nice management, nice customers....
rmeigs
2010-01-17 19:39:49 UTC
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rmeigs had written this in response to
http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Stuck-Delta-Faucet-Handle-142042-.htm
Post by John Keiser
The single lever Delta kitchen faucet [model 21460 - made in Denmark] has an
occassional dribble from the top. Minor, but I wanted to remove the handle
to tighten or replace the fittings.
The set screw will not move with an allen wrench and all the force I can
exert with pliers as leverage. Even a rachet with an allen fitting fails.
Short of drilling the screw out and buying a new handle, any ideas?
Thank you.
-------------------------------------
Here's what worked for me today:
Buy a can of compressed "air" for dusting photos, lenses, etc. Insert the
Allen wrench into the setscrew and heat the wrench with a torch (thus
sparing the faucet handle). Wait for the heat to migrate into the screw
and handle, remove the wrench, then invert the can of "air" (which will
produce super-cold liquid) and spray through the nozzle tube into the
setscrew. This breaks the bond between setscrew and handle, allowing the
screw to be removed. No drilling, no new parts, no handle damage!
h***@aol.com
2010-01-17 20:05:36 UTC
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Post by rmeigs
-------------------------------------
Buy a can of compressed "air" for dusting photos, lenses, etc. �Insert the
Allen wrench into the setscrew and heat the wrench with a torch (thus
sparing the faucet handle). �Wait for the heat to migrate into the screw
and handle, remove the wrench, then invert the can of "air" (which will
produce super-cold liquid) and spray through the nozzle tube into the
setscrew. �This breaks the bond between setscrew and handle, allowing the
screw to be removed. �No drilling, no new parts, no handle damage!
I am going to try this procedure on some other allens that get stuck
for my job.

Once its out dont forget to replace allen preferably with a stainless
one but lube the hole well before installing new allen
Catherine
2015-12-04 04:44:03 UTC
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Post by rmeigs
nsert the
e screw
wing the
!
I am going to try this procedure on some other allens that get stuck
for my job.
Once its out dont forget to replace allen preferably with a stainless
one but lube the hole well before installing new allen
Re: Delta Monitor Faucet handle

OMG ... same problem. I could not get that screw out of the Delta Monitor
faucet handle. After MANY hours of sticking a q-tip soaked in CLR in the
hole (keeping it wet) and tighten/loosen back and forth then soak some
more. repeat. repeat. repeat. I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!


--
ItsJoanNotJoann
2015-12-04 05:54:31 UTC
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Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
Micky
2015-12-04 08:14:20 UTC
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On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 21:54:31 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
But at least Bob is still here. It may give him great satisfaction
to see name mentioned. (his? wisdom revived)
bob haller
2015-12-04 12:45:02 UTC
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Post by Micky
On Thu, 3 Dec 2015 21:54:31 -0800 (PST), ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
But at least Bob is still here. It may give him great satisfaction
to see name mentioned. (his? wisdom revived)
Yeah its kinda nice when old threads reappear. it reminds me of some of what was going on back then.

my dogs puddle and susie were still alive and healthy, my marriage was still together, stuff like that
Stormin Mormon
2015-12-04 15:07:18 UTC
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Post by bob haller
my dogs puddle and susie were still alive and
healthy, my marriage was still together, stuff
like that
You playing country western records
backwards, Bob?
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
. www.lds.org
.
.
Stormin Mormon
2015-12-04 15:06:23 UTC
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Post by ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
No need to fly off the handle like
you have a screw loose.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
learn more about Jesus
. www.lds.org
.
.
Ed Pawlowski
2015-12-05 00:05:58 UTC
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Post by ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
Well duh, you have to let the penetrating oil soak in a while.
Oren
2015-12-05 02:40:29 UTC
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by ItsJoanNotJoann
Post by Catherine
I finally got the screw loose and the handle
off!!!!
Nine (9) year old thread.
Well duh, you have to let the penetrating oil soak in a while.
I have a small can, must be 40 years old and it still works. Not the
new stuff. Soon I'll need some more if I run out. It must still have
30 liquid drops in the can.
Devon Heron
2016-04-10 23:44:01 UTC
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replying to Ed Pawlowski, Devon Heron wrote:
I let liquid wrench soak over-night and didn't help... saw an earlier comment
on this thread and used the Creme-brulee torch (didn't harm the chrome) on the
set-screw for 30 seconds. (2 tries).. then the screw finally started to
move... now I have a fancy twisted hex-wrench! :-)
--
posted from
http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/stuck-delta-faucet-handle-142042-.htm
Catherine
2016-04-12 02:44:01 UTC
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replying to Ed Pawlowski, Catherine wrote:
I bet you feel like a big boy now!

--
posted from
http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/stuck-delta-faucet-handle-142042-.htm
Woodchuck
2016-11-27 03:44:01 UTC
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replying to ItsJoanNotJoann, Woodchuck wrote:
What is your point? Have setscrews stopped sticking on Delta faucet handles?
Or are you saying that all possible ways of freeing stuck setscrews have
already been presented here? I ask this because I have a stuck setscrew on a
Delta kitchen faucet this evening, 11/16/2016, and I found Devon Herin's post
from seven (7) months ago helpful and encouraging.

--
for full context, visit http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/stuck-delta-faucet-handle-142042-.htm
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