Discussion:
Water level indicator
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KenK
2017-01-05 16:28:46 UTC
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My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.

There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.

I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.

TIA
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.
trader_4
2017-01-05 16:37:27 UTC
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Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.
The ones for a propane tank might work on a water tank too.
They are just reacting to the difference in temperature
between the part of the tank that has liquid propane in it
and the part that doesn't. So, I would think you would see
a similar difference with a water tank. But how well they
actually work even on a propane tank, IDK. You would think
that at times there would be a decent temp difference between
the two areas. But I would think at other times, the diff
would be so small that the strip might not be able to detect it.
Ralph Mowery
2017-01-05 16:49:42 UTC
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Post by trader_4
The ones for a propane tank might work on a water tank too.
They are just reacting to the difference in temperature
between the part of the tank that has liquid propane in it
and the part that doesn't. So, I would think you would see
a similar difference with a water tank. But how well they
actually work even on a propane tank, IDK. You would think
that at times there would be a decent temp difference between
the two areas. But I would think at other times, the diff
would be so small that the strip might not be able to detect it.
I doubt they would work on water tanks. The propane comes out as a gas
and where the gas is boiling off the liquid is a large temperature and
pressure difference.

The water does not boil off the tank to come out unless you are using
steam out of the tank.
trader_4
2017-01-05 17:21:05 UTC
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Post by Ralph Mowery
Post by trader_4
The ones for a propane tank might work on a water tank too.
They are just reacting to the difference in temperature
between the part of the tank that has liquid propane in it
and the part that doesn't. So, I would think you would see
a similar difference with a water tank. But how well they
actually work even on a propane tank, IDK. You would think
that at times there would be a decent temp difference between
the two areas. But I would think at other times, the diff
would be so small that the strip might not be able to detect it.
I doubt they would work on water tanks. The propane comes out as a gas
and where the gas is boiling off the liquid is a large temperature and
pressure difference.
Do they require that gas be in use for them to work? You can't
tell if the tank is just sitting there? If so, then it makes
more sense, because I agree, you're going to have a bigger temp
difference when gas is coming out.
Post by Ralph Mowery
The water does not boil off the tank to come out unless you are using
steam out of the tank.
Agree, if it only works when gas is being withdrawn, then it's not
going to work with water, at least much of the time. I would think
it still could work when there is a temp change, ie it was 35 overnight,
now it's 50 outside and the tank is warming. Or vice-versa.
Ralph Mowery
2017-01-05 20:43:48 UTC
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Post by trader_4
Do they require that gas be in use for them to work? You can't
tell if the tank is just sitting there? If so, then it makes
more sense, because I agree, you're going to have a bigger temp
difference when gas is coming out.
Post by Ralph Mowery
The water does not boil off the tank to come out unless you are using
steam out of the tank.
Agree, if it only works when gas is being withdrawn, then it's not
going to work with water, at least much of the time. I would think
it still could work when there is a temp change, ie it was 35 overnight,
now it's 50 outside and the tank is warming. Or vice-versa.
Doing a little research on the indicators. They work by temperature.
Some require you to pour hot water over the strip while on the tank and
some don't. They do require you to have the gas flowing for about 10
minutes so the gas will boil off and there is a temperature difference.

There is anoter type that does not require the gas to be on. It uses
sound waves like many stud detectors do for the walls in your house. I
tried my stud detector on a BBQ tank and it did not seem to work, not
that I expected it to.

This type of detector may work for the water tank, or it may not.
FromTheRafters
2017-01-05 16:49:54 UTC
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Post by trader_4
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.
The ones for a propane tank might work on a water tank too.
They are just reacting to the difference in temperature
between the part of the tank that has liquid propane in it
and the part that doesn't. So, I would think you would see
a similar difference with a water tank. But how well they
actually work even on a propane tank, IDK. You would think
that at times there would be a decent temp difference between
the two areas. But I would think at other times, the diff
would be so small that the strip might not be able to detect it.
They are reacting to the temperature difference when you draw the
gaseous portion out, not when it is at equilibrium. It might work with
water if the sun shines on it because of the difference in heat
capacity though.
Retired
2017-01-05 16:39:24 UTC
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Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
Maybe this could work for you:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/water-tank-gauge-zmaz76jaztak
CRNG
2017-01-06 16:24:56 UTC
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Post by Retired
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
http://www.motherearthnews.com/diy/water-tank-gauge-zmaz76jaztak
That's a nice solution.
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
Email list-server groups and USENET are like having all of those
newspapers delivered to your door every morning.
burfordTjustice
2017-01-05 17:16:43 UTC
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On 5 Jan 2017 16:28:46 GMT
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap
in my kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have
become very erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on
propane tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking
water metal tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well
water. I did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned
out to be so stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects
though - chemicals yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
Local county usually will do the lab work
if you bring them a sample.

Bleach the well yearly and you should have no issues.
DerbyDad03
2017-01-05 18:21:02 UTC
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Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
What is the difference between the old schedule vs. the new and why do
you think it may cause you to run out?

If you have a valid reason for your concern (and I'm not doubting you in
any manner) have you spoken to the company that took over and explained
the issue? Perhaps a simple phone call resolve the issue and eliminate
your concerns, without the need to monitor the tank yourself.
KenK
2017-01-06 17:37:46 UTC
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Post by DerbyDad03
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap
in my kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have
become very erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on
propane tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking
water metal tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well
water. I did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned
out to be so stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects
though - chemicals yes, very very few bacteria checks.
TIA
What is the difference between the old schedule vs. the new and why do
you think it may cause you to run out?
The old service came at regular intervals, these guys come erratically.
Post by DerbyDad03
If you have a valid reason for your concern (and I'm not doubting you
in any manner) have you spoken to the company that took over and
explained the issue? Perhaps a simple phone call resolve the issue and
eliminate your concerns, without the need to monitor the tank
yourself.
I call, they say they'll refill, for example, 1/5/17. Yesterday no one
came. This is the usual. I'm about ready to change services. The problem
is that big water service owned water tank. I think there may be a
problem with removing it, especially if a new tank is moved in before the
old one is removed.
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.
dadiOH
2017-01-05 21:05:31 UTC
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Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
1. Drill a hole in or near the bottom of the tank.

2. Insert a clear 1/4" vinyl tube.

3. Tape of afix the tube to the side of the tank and extending above it.

The level of water in the tube shows the level of water in the tank.
Obviously, you'd need to use some sort of compression fitting - or maybe
silicone - where the tube goes into the tank so it doesn't leak.

Where I live, the County will check well water for contaminants. Assuming
it is not a shallow well ir is very unlikely to have harmful bacteria.
Ralph Mowery
2017-01-05 21:10:35 UTC
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Post by KenK
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
The water was fine, it was the kick in the head from the mule.
Thomas
2017-01-06 14:39:19 UTC
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"> 1. Drill a hole in or near the bottom of the tank.
2. Insert a clear 1/4" vinyl tube.
3. Tape of afix the tube to the side of the tank and extending above it.
+1
They sell good looking glass rods for this. I can't search from here right now but do a look at Berkley gravity filters. The accessories are there.
AquaRain also.
trader_4
2017-01-06 16:19:59 UTC
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Post by dadiOH
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap in my
kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have become very
erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on propane
tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking water metal
tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to be so
stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though - chemicals
yes, very very few bacteria checks.
1. Drill a hole in or near the bottom of the tank.
2. Insert a clear 1/4" vinyl tube.
3. Tape of afix the tube to the side of the tank and extending above it.
The level of water in the tube shows the level of water in the tank.
Obviously, you'd need to use some sort of compression fitting - or maybe
silicone - where the tube goes into the tank so it doesn't leak.
Best idea so far.
Post by dadiOH
Where I live, the County will check well water for contaminants. Assuming
it is not a shallow well ir is very unlikely to have harmful bacteria.
And if they won't test if themselves, they can tell him where to get
it tested. I think that's how it works here, if you have a well
you have to get it tested to get a CO. And like you say, what kind of
well it is matters. An old open well or one that's too close to a
septic field, etc is one thing. A proper 80 ft casing well is another.
KenK
2017-01-06 17:41:55 UTC
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Post by dadiOH
Post by KenK
My drinking water is stored in a metal water tank connected to a tap
in my kitchen. Since a new company has taken over the refills have
become very erratic.
There are small magnetic metal-sheet indicators you can put on
propane tanks to show the level. Is there such a thing for drinking
water metal tanks? I hate to have water run out just when I need it.
I often wonder if I'm being foolish and should just drink the well water. I
did when I was a kid on the farm. (Maybe that's why I turned out to
be so stupid!) I can't find a kit to check its health aspects though
- chemicals yes, very very few bacteria checks.
1. Drill a hole in or near the bottom of the tank.
Can't, water company owns the tank.
Post by dadiOH
2. Insert a clear 1/4" vinyl tube.
3. Tape of afix the tube to the side of the tank and extending above it.
The level of water in the tube shows the level of water in the tank.
Obviously, you'd need to use some sort of compression fitting - or
maybe silicone - where the tube goes into the tank so it doesn't leak.
Where I live, the County will check well water for contaminants.
Assuming it is not a shallow well it is very unlikely to have harmful
bacteria.
That's beginning to look like my best choice. Have to see who in county
does this. It's a deep well, if 90' is deep. Not a sand point, anyhow.
--
I love a good meal! That's why I don't cook.
Retired
2017-01-06 18:47:48 UTC
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Post by KenK
Post by dadiOH
1. Drill a hole in or near the bottom of the tank.
Can't, water company owns the tank.
Can you tap the line into the house ? As long as it is before any
pump, a vertical tube should work. It does not have to be at the tank.
See my earlier post.

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