Discussion:
Water ph
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Ciny
2017-01-06 03:44:01 UTC
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How do i check water ph?
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Lacopo Ferrari
2017-01-06 03:53:38 UTC
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Post by Ciny
How do i check water ph?
http://www.poolandhottubdepot.com/pentair-chlorine-ph-2-in-1-test-kit/?gclid=CN7H0anPrNECFZSIfgodwMcLDg
Grampy
2017-01-06 04:44:01 UTC
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replying to Ciny, Grampy wrote:
Use one these:
https://www.amazon.com/VANTAKOOL-PH-Tester-Measurement-Blue/dp/B01M262AGE/

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g***@aol.com
2017-01-06 05:31:11 UTC
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On Fri, 06 Jan 2017 04:44:01 GMT, Grampy
Post by Grampy
https://www.amazon.com/VANTAKOOL-PH-Tester-Measurement-Blue/dp/B01M262AGE/
You are far better off with one of these
<https://www.amazon.com/Pool-tools-00-481-Standard-Dual/dp/B0038YL4M8/ref=sr_1_5?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1483680077&sr=1-5&keywords=ph+tester+kit>
I do water testing for the state and I have used a range of digital
testers, my current one is an $8000 YSI Pro and if I don't calibrate
it every time I use it, the results are all over the place. A cheap
one you do not calibrate is just a random number generator that may
give you a rough idea of pH but I would not trust it. The chemical
testers may not get you out to 2 decimal places but it will be
accurate +/- 0.4 points every time.
Frank
2017-01-06 13:57:41 UTC
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Post by g***@aol.com
On Fri, 06 Jan 2017 04:44:01 GMT, Grampy
Post by Grampy
https://www.amazon.com/VANTAKOOL-PH-Tester-Measurement-Blue/dp/B01M262AGE/
You are far better off with one of these
<https://www.amazon.com/Pool-tools-00-481-Standard-Dual/dp/B0038YL4M8/ref=sr_1_5?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1483680077&sr=1-5&keywords=ph+tester+kit>
I do water testing for the state and I have used a range of digital
testers, my current one is an $8000 YSI Pro and if I don't calibrate
it every time I use it, the results are all over the place. A cheap
one you do not calibrate is just a random number generator that may
give you a rough idea of pH but I would not trust it. The chemical
testers may not get you out to 2 decimal places but it will be
accurate +/- 0.4 points every time.
Good comments by someone who appears current. I'm a retired chemist but
it has been years since I worked at the bench. pH meters were expensive
and finicky and now it appears you can get them cheaply but these are
finicky.

I've got a bunch of old pH papers left over from my lab days. Work OK
but maybe no more accurate than half a unit which is fine for most of
the stuff I want to check like house water and soil.
rbowman
2017-01-06 14:48:29 UTC
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Post by Frank
Good comments by someone who appears current. I'm a retired chemist but
it has been years since I worked at the bench. pH meters were expensive
and finicky and now it appears you can get them cheaply but these are
finicky.
What was the problem? I worked for Orion Research back in the early '80s
and recall the Ross electrodes as being quite stable. I'm a programmer
though and not a chemist so I viewed them as a voltage source for the
A/D that gave me numbers to play with.

The chemists were a strange lot, including Dr. Ross.
g***@aol.com
2017-01-06 15:48:24 UTC
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Post by rbowman
Post by Frank
Good comments by someone who appears current. I'm a retired chemist but
it has been years since I worked at the bench. pH meters were expensive
and finicky and now it appears you can get them cheaply but these are
finicky.
What was the problem? I worked for Orion Research back in the early '80s
and recall the Ross electrodes as being quite stable. I'm a programmer
though and not a chemist so I viewed them as a voltage source for the
A/D that gave me numbers to play with.
The chemists were a strange lot, including Dr. Ross.
I just know I have been issued Hanna and YSI water testing instruments
and if they are not calibrated frequently, you can't trust them.
Frank
2017-01-06 17:32:29 UTC
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Post by g***@aol.com
Post by rbowman
Post by Frank
Good comments by someone who appears current. I'm a retired chemist but
it has been years since I worked at the bench. pH meters were expensive
and finicky and now it appears you can get them cheaply but these are
finicky.
What was the problem? I worked for Orion Research back in the early '80s
and recall the Ross electrodes as being quite stable. I'm a programmer
though and not a chemist so I viewed them as a voltage source for the
A/D that gave me numbers to play with.
The chemists were a strange lot, including Dr. Ross.
I just know I have been issued Hanna and YSI water testing instruments
and if they are not calibrated frequently, you can't trust them.
In the lab I might be checking pH of a reaction every day and
calibration was constantly done. As a home owner some cheap meter that
you might only use every few months would also have to be checked when
used. Papers would be more reliable.
g***@aol.com
2017-01-06 18:54:33 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by g***@aol.com
Post by rbowman
Post by Frank
Good comments by someone who appears current. I'm a retired chemist but
it has been years since I worked at the bench. pH meters were expensive
and finicky and now it appears you can get them cheaply but these are
finicky.
What was the problem? I worked for Orion Research back in the early '80s
and recall the Ross electrodes as being quite stable. I'm a programmer
though and not a chemist so I viewed them as a voltage source for the
A/D that gave me numbers to play with.
The chemists were a strange lot, including Dr. Ross.
I just know I have been issued Hanna and YSI water testing instruments
and if they are not calibrated frequently, you can't trust them.
In the lab I might be checking pH of a reaction every day and
calibration was constantly done. As a home owner some cheap meter that
you might only use every few months would also have to be checked when
used. Papers would be more reliable.
The phenol testers are as good as litmus paper, perhaps better.
The cheap one you use for a pool is plenty for most things. We had a
more precise phenol tester that used a slightly different chemical
that had a narrower range. I still use it as a sanity check on my
digital meter.
The old saying goes the difference between accuracy and precision is a
digital meter can give you a wildly inaccurate measurement, precise
down to 3 decimal places.

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