Discussion:
turning tomato plants
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Ralph Mowery
2017-03-08 00:08:50 UTC
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This is the first time I have tried growing tomatoes from seeds. They
are growing fine. Maybe too early for some, but I am going to put them
in large pots and near a garage window as soon as the temperature warms
up some to get a good head start on a few of them.

They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum sun.
I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow that way
or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less streight up ?
Oren
2017-03-08 00:52:25 UTC
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On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
This is the first time I have tried growing tomatoes from seeds. They
are growing fine. Maybe too early for some, but I am going to put them
in large pots and near a garage window as soon as the temperature warms
up some to get a good head start on a few of them.
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum sun.
I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow that way
or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.

When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
the plant more stable and stronger. See pic:

<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>

Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV

--- hens not included

<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
Terry Coombs
2017-03-08 03:03:53 UTC
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Post by Oren
On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
This is the first time I have tried growing tomatoes from seeds.
They are growing fine. Maybe too early for some, but I am going to
put them in large pots and near a garage window as soon as the
temperature warms up some to get a good head start on a few of them.
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum
sun. I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow
that way or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less
streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
Letting them get a breeze is also beneficial to a sturdy stem . Mine are
in a S.E. facing window , on warm days I open the window a little .
Post by Oren
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
--- hens not included
<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
As Oren said , bury them deep , water early in the day , and I prefer
rabbit/goat/cow manure . Chicken is OK if composted for a few months to a
year . I've got a compost pile all ready to spread and till into the soil ,
heavy on the chicken litter .
--
Snag



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bob haller
2017-03-08 03:55:04 UTC
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Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
This is the first time I have tried growing tomatoes from seeds.
They are growing fine. Maybe too early for some, but I am going to
put them in large pots and near a garage window as soon as the
temperature warms up some to get a good head start on a few of them.
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum
sun. I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow
that way or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less
streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
Letting them get a breeze is also beneficial to a sturdy stem . Mine are
in a S.E. facing window , on warm days I open the window a little .
Post by Oren
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
--- hens not included
<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
As Oren said , bury them deep , water early in the day , and I prefer
rabbit/goat/cow manure . Chicken is OK if composted for a few months to a
year . I've got a compost pile all ready to spread and till into the soil ,
heavy on the chicken litter .
--
Snag
I never bury them deep. i dig a trench and plant them on their side,.]]
Oren
2017-03-08 04:29:46 UTC
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Post by bob haller
Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
This is the first time I have tried growing tomatoes from seeds.
They are growing fine. Maybe too early for some, but I am going to
put them in large pots and near a garage window as soon as the
temperature warms up some to get a good head start on a few of them.
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum
sun. I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow
that way or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less
streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
Letting them get a breeze is also beneficial to a sturdy stem . Mine are
in a S.E. facing window , on warm days I open the window a little .
Post by Oren
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
--- hens not included
<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
As Oren said , bury them deep , water early in the day , and I prefer
rabbit/goat/cow manure . Chicken is OK if composted for a few months to a
year . I've got a compost pile all ready to spread and till into the soil ,
heavy on the chicken litter .
--
Snag
I never bury them deep. i dig a trench and plant them on their side,.]]
Same principle Bob. Dust the stems, where you remove the two bottom
set of leaves and to the root ball with a rooting hormone from a
garden center. The hormone expedites root growth that give the plant
strength. Trees actually grow stronger by wind as Snag suggested. The
roots fight more to stabilize the plant and seek nutrients in the
soil.

Before the plants are moved from an inside window to outside do that
easily. Let the tender plants acclimate to the heat of the sun.
Inside, outside and rotate that way so they don't burn suddenly by
exposure to the heat outside. A few days may be enough. Start with
short periods outside, then a little longer each day until planted.
Ralph Mowery
2017-03-08 15:44:39 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, ***@127.0.0.1
says...
Post by Oren
Post by bob haller
I never bury them deep. i dig a trench and plant them on their side,.]]
Same principle Bob. Dust the stems, where you remove the two bottom
set of leaves and to the root ball with a rooting hormone from a
garden center. The hormone expedites root growth that give the plant
strength. Trees actually grow stronger by wind as Snag suggested. The
roots fight more to stabilize the plant and seek nutrients in the
soil.
Before the plants are moved from an inside window to outside do that
easily. Let the tender plants acclimate to the heat of the sun.
Inside, outside and rotate that way so they don't burn suddenly by
exposure to the heat outside. A few days may be enough. Start with
short periods outside, then a little longer each day until planted.
I have not heard about putting any rooting hormone on the plants. If I
can find that, I will give it a try. I do put them in the ground deep.
I sometimes use some post hole diggers and about one hit in the soft
ground will do it. I run a tiller over the ground and toss out a couple
of hand fulls of furtlizer before I get out the tiller. That mixes it up
in the ground.
Oren
2017-03-08 16:51:12 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Mar 2017 10:44:39 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
I have not heard about putting any rooting hormone on the plants. If I
can find that, I will give it a try. I do put them in the ground deep.
I sometimes use some post hole diggers and about one hit in the soft
ground will do it. I run a tiller over the ground and toss out a couple
of hand fulls of furtlizer before I get out the tiller. That mixes it up
in the ground.
Check to make sure it is safe for edible food plant. Sorry I might
have jumped the shark. I have used it for plants and propagating
plants.

The MSDS calls it a pesticide:

<http://www.scottsmsds.com/?product_name=Dry+Powder+Rooting+Hormone&upc=&regulation_number=&search_submit=Search>

_Miracle-Gro® FastRoot1® Dry Powder Rooting Hormone_

<http://www.miraclegro.com/smg/goprod/miracle-gro-fastroot-1-dry-powder-rooting-hormone-plant-food/prod11090005>

There are other brands too.
Oren
2017-03-08 04:43:42 UTC
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Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
Letting them get a breeze is also beneficial to a sturdy stem . Mine are
in a S.E. facing window , on warm days I open the window a little .
A breeze is good. It forces a plant to send root deeper into the
soil. The plant wants to survive.
Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
--- hens not included
<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
As Oren said , bury them deep , water early in the day , and I prefer
rabbit/goat/cow manure . Chicken is OK if composted for a few months to a
year . I've got a compost pile all ready to spread and till into the soil ,
heavy on the chicken litter .
Fish emulsion is good for tomatoes. I've buried whole carp, fish guts
in the garden. If you have a river nearby, take a trash can and get
some great muck along the river bank or from a boat ramp that has
flooded and left mud on the ramp.
Uncle Monster
2017-03-08 05:28:59 UTC
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Post by Oren
Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
Letting them get a breeze is also beneficial to a sturdy stem . Mine are
in a S.E. facing window , on warm days I open the window a little .
A breeze is good. It forces a plant to send root deeper into the
soil. The plant wants to survive.
Post by Terry Coombs
Post by Oren
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
--- hens not included
<http://www.the-organic-gardener.com/chicken-manure.html>
As Oren said , bury them deep , water early in the day , and I prefer
rabbit/goat/cow manure . Chicken is OK if composted for a few months to a
year . I've got a compost pile all ready to spread and till into the soil ,
heavy on the chicken litter .
Fish emulsion is good for tomatoes. I've buried whole carp, fish guts
in the garden. If you have a river nearby, take a trash can and get
some great muck along the river bank or from a boat ramp that has
flooded and left mud on the ramp.
My late friend GB grew tomatoes in a small patch of his backyard right outside the door to his shop. Ho buried the ends of several 2"PVD pipes which the tomato vines were tied to. He poured fertilizer and water down the pipes and would water the plants by filling the pipes with water several times a week. I'm not sure what he did to the buried ends of the PVC such at drilling holes in them but the tops were at about 6 feet and the vines went to the top of the pipes. t(ツ)_/¯

[8~{} Uncle Vine Monster
Ralph Mowery
2017-03-08 04:21:31 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, ***@127.0.0.1
says...
Post by Oren
On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum sun.
I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow that way
or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most of
the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground making
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
Thanks for the reply. I have grown tomatoes for many years but always
bought the plants from a green house.

I thought I would try to grow some from seeds that I bought. I had
moved several years ago and the place where I bought the plants is now
about 20 miles away. Thought I would try some from seeds to save the
drive and I can get a big head start on 3 or 4 plants by putting them in
a large pot in my garage later. Beats paying 3 or 4 dollars for the
ones like that. The small plants were not too bad. About 3 for a
dollar, but later in the season they often do not have any.

I started a few seeds a couple of weeks ago and they are looking good.
Have a few more coming up now. I have been turning the plants as they
seem to want to grow about a 45 deg angle to the sun. About another 5
or 6 weeks and it should be safe to move them to the garden area.
Last frost around here is about the middle of April.
Terry Coombs
2017-03-08 05:08:30 UTC
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Post by Ralph Mowery
Post by Oren
On Tue, 7 Mar 2017 19:08:50 -0500, Ralph Mowery
Post by Ralph Mowery
They are inside the house at a window facing south for the maximum
sun. I know plants tend to bend to the sun. Should I let them grow
that way or turn them every day or two to they will be more or less
streight up ?
Rotating them each day can be beneficial, and strengthen them...IMO.
When you plant them, remove two sets of bottom leaves and bury most
of the stem/stalk. This allows more roots to sprout in the ground
<https://tinyurl.com/zupah74>
Water early in the day so the levees dry before night fail. This
reduces chances of rot and disease. Dehydrated chicken manure, made
into a tea or mixed in the soil makes a great fertilizer. (don't use
fresh or you burn the plants up. YMMV
Thanks for the reply. I have grown tomatoes for many years but always
bought the plants from a green house.
I thought I would try to grow some from seeds that I bought. I had
moved several years ago and the place where I bought the plants is now
about 20 miles away. Thought I would try some from seeds to save the
drive and I can get a big head start on 3 or 4 plants by putting them
in a large pot in my garage later. Beats paying 3 or 4 dollars for
the ones like that. The small plants were not too bad. About 3 for a
dollar, but later in the season they often do not have any.
I started a few seeds a couple of weeks ago and they are looking good.
Have a few more coming up now. I have been turning the plants as they
seem to want to grow about a 45 deg angle to the sun. About another 5
or 6 weeks and it should be safe to move them to the garden area.
Last frost around here is about the middle of April.
Ralph , do yourself a favor and get some heirloom seeds . They will breed
true from saved seed and you'll never buy seeds again . I have a fairly
large cache of saved heirlooms , if you'd like me to I can mail you some .
My reply-to is good , send me a list and I'll send you anything I have -
enough seed to grow some to eat this year and have seed for next .
--
Snag



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Ralph Mowery
2017-03-08 15:37:44 UTC
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Post by Terry Coombs
Ralph , do yourself a favor and get some heirloom seeds . They will breed
true from saved seed and you'll never buy seeds again . I have a fairly
large cache of saved heirlooms , if you'd like me to I can mail you some .
My reply-to is good , send me a list and I'll send you anything I have -
enough seed to grow some to eat this year and have seed for next .
Thanks Terry,

Reply sent off list.

My wife and I like a tomato that has a lot of acid taste to it. I don't
know the names of any of the hairloom ones.
Terry Coombs
2017-03-08 18:44:49 UTC
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Post by Ralph Mowery
Post by Terry Coombs
Ralph , do yourself a favor and get some heirloom seeds . They
will breed true from saved seed and you'll never buy seeds again . I
have a fairly large cache of saved heirlooms , if you'd like me to I
can mail you some . My reply-to is good , send me a list and I'll
send you anything I have - enough seed to grow some to eat this
year and have seed for next .
Thanks Terry,
Reply sent off list.
My wife and I like a tomato that has a lot of acid taste to it. I
don't know the names of any of the hairloom ones.
You sent it to the msn.com email? Hasn't shown up yet , I'll ping you
when it does .
--
Snag



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