Discussion:
Hard water - not filtered by water board?
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James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 12:12:23 UTC
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Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
--
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alan_m
2017-10-12 12:47:51 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
--
mailto: news {at} admac {dot] myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
The Natural Philosopher
2017-10-12 13:28:02 UTC
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Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
Their pipes don't scale up.
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James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:29:44 UTC
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Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
Their pipes don't scale up.
Why not?
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Steve Walker
2017-10-12 14:23:01 UTC
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Post by The Natural Philosopher
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
Their pipes don't scale up.
Not properly scale, but they do get a coating. That is why in soft-water
areas they add phosphates (phosphate dosing) to reduce the absorbtion of
lead from old pipes.

SteveW
Bod
2017-10-12 13:57:04 UTC
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Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.

Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health | Spectator Health
https://health.spectator.co.uk › Heart
3 Nov 2016 - 'Real improvement in magnesium nutrition is seen only where
water is hard,' he says. ... If you live in a hard water area, turning
on the tap instead of reaching for a bottle of water is a good start. If
you must drink bottled water, it's better to choose one enriched with
minerals rather than purged of 'impurities'.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:59:21 UTC
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Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?=
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if th=
e
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the wa=
ter.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft wate=
r
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health | Spectator Hea=
lth
https://health.spectator.co.uk =E2=80=BA Heart
3 Nov 2016 - 'Real improvement in magnesium nutrition is seen only whe=
re
water is hard,' he says. ... If you live in a hard water area, turning=
on the tap instead of reaching for a bottle of water is a good start. =
If
you must drink bottled water, it's better to choose one enriched with
minerals rather than purged of 'impurities'.
I'm sure you get all that stuff from food. People make too much fuss a=
bout minerals and vitamins.

-- =

Brazil nuts are an STD. If you eat a Brazil nut then have sex with some=
one who has nut allergies, they will have an allergic reaction.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:07:44 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle? I know of people in London who don;t soften their water. Their kettles don't break. A kettle is too simple a device to care.
--
Brazil nuts are an STD. If you eat a Brazil nut then have sex with someone who has nut allergies, they will have an allergic reaction.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:13:06 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften their
water.  Their kettles don't break.  A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:15:25 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle? I know of people in London who don;t soften their
water. Their kettles don't break. A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
--
Went to the pub with my girlfriend last night.
Locals were shouting "paedophile!" and other names at me, just because my girlfriend is 21 and I'm 50.
It completely spoilt our 10th anniversary.
alan_m
2017-10-12 14:18:32 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
--
mailto: news {at} admac {dot] myzen {dot} co {dot} uk
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:24:55 UTC
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Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
I've never known anyone's kettle break after only a year or two, and I'm in a very soft water area. I'd say they last 5 to 10 years.
--
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Put your dog and your wife in the trunk of the car for an hour.
When you open the trunk, who is really happy to see you!
NY
2017-10-12 15:58:15 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
I've never known anyone's kettle break after only a year or two, and I'm
in a very soft water area. I'd say they last 5 to 10 years.
My kettle is probably about 10 years old. The only "breakage" was temporary
when the thermostat which switches it off when the water boils failed so the
kettle would not stay on. I got used to holding the switch down with the
edge of a plate, and manually switching it off. I tend to make coffee rather
than tea, so I don't want the water to get as high as 100 deg C anyway. One
day I accidentally let the kettle boil for a minute or so before I switched
it off. From then on, the thermostat has worked fine again: the switch now
latches down again and clicks off when the water boils.

But no leaks. I still remember when I first heard about plastic kettles
being developed, in the late 70s, and it made me think of chocolate teapots,
because I though of plastics as things that softened and melted well below
100 deg C - not realising that new types of plastic were being developed
that would withstand that temperature.
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 16:40:04 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
I've never known anyone's kettle break after only a year or two, and I'm
in a very soft water area. I'd say they last 5 to 10 years.
My kettle is probably about 10 years old. The only "breakage" was temporary
when the thermostat which switches it off when the water boils failed so the
kettle would not stay on. I got used to holding the switch down with the
edge of a plate, and manually switching it off. I tend to make coffee rather
than tea, so I don't want the water to get as high as 100 deg C anyway. One
day I accidentally let the kettle boil for a minute or so before I switched
it off. From then on, the thermostat has worked fine again: the switch now
latches down again and clicks off when the water boils.
But no leaks. I still remember when I first heard about plastic kettles
being developed, in the late 70s, and it made me think of chocolate teapots,
because I though of plastics as things that softened and melted well below
100 deg C - not realising that new types of plastic were being developed
that would withstand that temperature.
Had you not heard of bakelite? You could almost put that on a gas stove.
--
New Socialism consists essentially in being seen to have your heart in
the right place whilst your head is in the clouds and your hand is in
someone else's pocket.
Steve Walker
2017-10-12 14:25:11 UTC
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Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Our last kettle lasted 15 years. My parents replaced a 25 year old one
simply because it looked very dated.

SteveW
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:56:17 UTC
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Post by Steve Walker
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Our last kettle lasted 15 years. My parents replaced a 25 year old one
simply because it looked very dated.
Turning one on with no water when it's full of scale makes a big mess.
--
Heaven is where the police are British, the chefs Italian, the mechanics
German, the lovers French and it is all organized by the Swiss.

Hell is where the police are German, the chefs British, the mechanics
French, the lovers Swiss and it is all organized by Italians.
NY
2017-10-12 16:02:24 UTC
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Post by Steve Walker
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Our last kettle lasted 15 years. My parents replaced a 25 year old one
simply because it looked very dated.
Yes my parents had an old-fashioned kettle - the sort that was low and wide,
rather than tall and narrow like a jug - and it was made of "silver"
(nickel?) plated steel. That worked for as long as I can remember. It may
have been a wedding present, in which case it probably lasted about 25 or 30
years. Like you, I think my parents replaced it for a jug kettle that was
easier to use, turned itself off and didn't leak steam from the lid onto
your hand as you picked it up by the handle to pour it - jug kettles have
the handle at the side rather than in the path of any steam that may come
from the lid/spout.
Graham.
2017-10-12 17:03:48 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 17:02:24 +0100, "NY" <***@privacy.net> coalesced
the vapors of human experience into a viable and meaningful
comprehension...
Post by NY
Post by Steve Walker
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Our last kettle lasted 15 years. My parents replaced a 25 year old one
simply because it looked very dated.
Yes my parents had an old-fashioned kettle - the sort that was low and wide,
rather than tall and narrow like a jug - and it was made of "silver"
(nickel?) plated steel. That worked for as long as I can remember. It may
have been a wedding present, in which case it probably lasted about 25 or 30
years. Like you, I think my parents replaced it for a jug kettle that was
easier to use, turned itself off and didn't leak steam from the lid onto
your hand as you picked it up by the handle to pour it - jug kettles have
the handle at the side rather than in the path of any steam that may come
from the lid/spout.
Russell Hobbs K2.
If you boiled it dry the big round connector shot out of the socket.

https://www.madaboutthehouse.com/design-classics-21-the-russell-hobbs-k2-kettle/
--
Graham.
%Profound_observation%
NY
2017-10-12 17:18:17 UTC
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Post by Graham.
Post by NY
Yes my parents had an old-fashioned kettle - the sort that was low and wide,
rather than tall and narrow like a jug - and it was made of "silver"
(nickel?) plated steel. That worked for as long as I can remember. It may
have been a wedding present, in which case it probably lasted about 25 or 30
years. Like you, I think my parents replaced it for a jug kettle that was
easier to use, turned itself off and didn't leak steam from the lid onto
your hand as you picked it up by the handle to pour it - jug kettles have
the handle at the side rather than in the path of any steam that may come
from the lid/spout.
Russell Hobbs K2.
If you boiled it dry the big round connector shot out of the socket.
https://www.madaboutthehouse.com/design-classics-21-the-russell-hobbs-k2-kettle/
Yes, similar to that. My parents' kettle didn't even shoot the lead out of
the kettle. I think the difference with theirs was that the handle was solid
Bakelite right from the switch/socket/element connector on the back to the
point where it attached near the spout, rather than having metal rods and
only the handle in Bakelite. I'm wondering whether theirs even had a switch
or whether you needed to switch it off at the wall socket - not sure about
that.

Certainly it had a proprietary mains plug/socket like the K2 rather than IEC
C13/C14 which I tend to refer to as "kettle connectors" because *modern*
kettles have them (as well as most other devices like PC PSUs). As a matter
of interest, what's the name for the "clover-leaf" 3-pin plug/socket that's
used for some laptop-charger mains leads.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:26:57 UTC
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Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Spot on.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:55:09 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Spot on.
My grandfather sealed his with a bar of soap.
--
Is it just a coincidence that Christianity and insanity end with the same letters?
NY
2017-10-12 16:04:08 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Probably cheaper than softening the water.
In soft water areas kettles just leak after a year or two - scale seals
the leaks.
Spot on.
My grandfather sealed his with a bar of soap.
What prevented the soap leeching into the water after that? Obviously he'd
wash out majority of the soap residue fairly well, but I'd have though the
water would always taste very slightly soapy afterwards.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:15:47 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle? I know of people in London who don;t soften their
water. Their kettles don't break. A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour? I hope you give the old one to charity.
--
I was at an ATM yesterday when a little old lady asked if I could check her balance, so I pushed her over.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:25:39 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften their
water.  Their kettles don't break.  A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour?  I hope you give the old one to
charity.
No, but we always offer it to people we think might need one.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:55:38 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle? I know of people in London who don;t soften their
water. Their kettles don't break. A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour? I hope you give the old one to charity.
No, but we always offer it to people we think might need one.
I had the idea you threw things away a lot.
--
Religion has actually convinced people that there's an invisible man -- living in the sky -- who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do.. And if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever 'til the end of time! ..But He loves you. -- George Carlin
Bod
2017-10-12 15:14:40 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by Bod
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften their
water.  Their kettles don't break.  A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour?  I hope you give the old one to
charity.
No, but we always offer it to people we think might need one.
I had the idea you threw things away a lot.
Not always.
Our local charity shop won't accept second hand electrical goods anyway.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:55:55 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead. It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle? I know of people in London who don;t soften their
water. Their kettles don't break. A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour? I hope you give the old one to charity.
No, but we always offer it to people we think might need one.
Does your wife not volunteer in a charity shop?
--
Religion has actually convinced people that there's an invisible man -- living in the sky -- who watches everything you do, every minute of every day. And the invisible man has a special list of ten things he does not want you to do.. And if you do any of these ten things, he has a special place, full of fire and smoke and burning and torture and anguish, where he will send you to live and suffer and burn and choke and scream and cry forever and ever 'til the end of time! ..But He loves you. -- George Carlin
Bod
2017-10-12 15:15:30 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by Bod
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften their
water.  Their kettles don't break.  A kettle is too simple a device to
care.
Ours don't break, but they are so cheap we buy a new one about every 5-6
years anyway.
Because you want one a different colour?  I hope you give the old one to
charity.
No, but we always offer it to people we think might need one.
Does your wife not volunteer in a charity shop?
She recently packed it up. She'd worked there for over 7 years.
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 16:37:40 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften their
water.  Their kettles don't break.
No, but they fur up. Then bits of the fur break off and get into your
tea/coffee.
--
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Bod
2017-10-12 16:47:39 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften
their water.  Their kettles don't break.
No, but they fur up. Then bits of the fur break off and get into your
tea/coffee.
They do not. There's a filter on the kettle pourer, a very fine mesh.
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 17:04:07 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften
their water.  Their kettles don't break.
No, but they fur up. Then bits of the fur break off and get into your
tea/coffee.
They do not. There's a filter on the kettle pourer, a very fine mesh.
Yes they do. Our such filter fell to pieces as it got furred up.
--
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Bod
2017-10-12 17:15:03 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up if the
area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft water
doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften
their water.  Their kettles don't break.
No, but they fur up. Then bits of the fur break off and get into your
tea/coffee.
They do not. There's a filter on the kettle pourer, a very fine mesh.
Yes they do. Our such filter fell to pieces as it got furred up.
Ah, that's different. Get a replacement filter.
I clean ours regularly with a soft toothbrush(gently).
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 17:17:53 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by alan_m
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
They may want the pipes (or the ones to your house) to scale up
if the area still has a lot of lead.  It stops the lead leaching
into the water.
that's true and also hard water contains important minerals. Soft
water doesn't, so hard water is better for you.
Hard water: bad for your kettle, great for your health
Bad for your kettle?  I know of people in London  who don;t soften
their water.  Their kettles don't break.
No, but they fur up. Then bits of the fur break off and get into your
tea/coffee.
They do not. There's a filter on the kettle pourer, a very fine mesh.
Yes they do. Our such filter fell to pieces as it got furred up.
Ah, that's different. Get a replacement filter.
I clean ours regularly with a soft toothbrush(gently).
No available: model too old. Kettle itself works fine, although I could
wish it turned itself off slightly sooner. But it'll soon be moot as we
are getting a boiling water tap.
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rather than for the terms of our departure.

Jacob Rees-Mogg MP
NY
2017-10-12 12:47:52 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.

And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 12:58:51 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
--
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Martin Brown
2017-10-12 13:12:44 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
It is also expensive and only really matters for some things like making
tea - too much calcium and you get a layer of brown scum on top. The
right hardness matters for coffee too but only affects the taste.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.

The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even seal
minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 13:15:38 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.
The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even seal
minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
But if you get continuous deposition in the pipes, after some amount of
time no water flows.
--
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real question is, "What causes wealth?"

Hint: it ain't Socialism.
Martin Brown
2017-10-12 13:43:25 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Martin Brown
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your
house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.
The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even
seal minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
But if you get continuous deposition in the pipes, after some amount of
time no water flows.
Except in insanely hard water regions it requires evaporation and
exactly the right pH for calcium carbonate to plate out at any speed.
These conditions are not normally met in a pipe unless there is a leak.

Heating it in a kettle or boiler is the most common source od problems
with hard water since that does make it come out of solution quickly.

I recall some drain pipes in a former dye chemical plant that were
hugely entertaining when removed after the plant was closed. I believe
some clocks and other ornaments were made from polished sections of it.
Heaven knows what noxious ancient aniline dyes were in there.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 13:46:47 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Martin Brown
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your
house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.
The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even
seal minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
But if you get continuous deposition in the pipes, after some amount of
time no water flows.
Except in insanely hard water regions it requires evaporation and
exactly the right pH for calcium carbonate to plate out at any speed.
These conditions are not normally met in a pipe unless there is a leak.
OK.
Post by Martin Brown
Heating it in a kettle or boiler is the most common source od problems
with hard water since that does make it come out of solution quickly.
Ha yes, I decoked the kettles and the urn at our village hall a few
weeks ago. That took ten of the lactic acid sachets.
--
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- Jeff Polk
NY
2017-10-12 15:46:53 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Martin Brown
Heating it in a kettle or boiler is the most common source od problems
with hard water since that does make it come out of solution quickly.
Ha yes, I decoked the kettles and the urn at our village hall a few
weeks ago. That took ten of the lactic acid sachets.
I decoked my coffee maker: the sort that gurgled and spluttered while it
heated water as it was drawn from a cold-water reservoir to the nozzle that
dripped it over a filter of coffee grounds. Something in the descaling
solution attacked the metal pipe and it began to leak. Maybe it had already
corroded and had only been kept watertight by limescale that had now been
dissolved.

I went over to the low-tech solution of a kettle of hot (but not boiling)
water into a cafetiere. Quicker, quieter and no descaling needed. At least
with a kettle you can heat the element with no water in for few seconds, and
then drench it with a jug of cold water to shatter the scale off the
element.

Living in a soft water area now, I no longer have a limescale problem.
Martin Brown
2017-10-12 16:00:54 UTC
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Post by NY
I went over to the low-tech solution of a kettle of hot (but not
boiling) water into a cafetiere. Quicker, quieter and no descaling
needed. At least with a kettle you can heat the element with no water in
for few seconds, and then drench it with a jug of cold water to shatter
the scale off the element.
Living in a soft water area now, I no longer have a limescale problem.
It is interesting in the case of coffee that the right amount of
hardness is critical for getting the best possible brew.

I was at a lecture on the chemistry of coffee making (sponsored by a
maker of commercial barista coffee machines) and with an expert present
with all the methods of making the stuff and tasting some very exotic
single estate coffees and single species/varieties.

The most fun was him making coffee with different qualities of water:

1. Pure water (reverse osmosis potable grade)
2. Newcastle tap water
3. Evian water

It was recommended to taste them in that order too.

#1 was OK but rather soft, dull and lacklustre.
#2 was a very nice balanced cup of coffee.
#3 was disgusting with free bases that tasted really bitter.

Turns out Newcastle tapwater is almost perfect for coffee making.
--
Regards,
Martin Brown
Rob Morley
2017-10-12 16:22:08 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 17:00:54 +0100
Post by Martin Brown
Turns out Newcastle tapwater is almost perfect for coffee making.
Which Newcastle?
Ed Pawlowski
2017-10-12 17:17:37 UTC
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Post by Rob Morley
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 17:00:54 +0100
Post by Martin Brown
Turns out Newcastle tapwater is almost perfect for coffee making.
Which Newcastle?
The only one that matters, in Delaware. Am I right?
Ed Pawlowski
2017-10-12 17:16:51 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
1. Pure water (reverse osmosis potable grade)
2. Newcastle tap water
3. Evian water
It was recommended to taste them in that order too.
#1 was OK but rather soft, dull and lacklustre.
#2 was a very nice balanced cup of coffee.
#3 was disgusting with free bases that tasted really bitter.
Turns out Newcastle tapwater is almost perfect for coffee making.
RO water is pure, and that is a problem. The best water has some
minerals in it. Some bottled water is RO processed and then some
minerals are put back in so it has a good taste.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:12:03 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Martin Brown
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your
house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.
The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even
seal minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
But if you get continuous deposition in the pipes, after some amount of
time no water flows.
Except in insanely hard water regions it requires evaporation and
exactly the right pH for calcium carbonate to plate out at any speed.
These conditions are not normally met in a pipe unless there is a leak.
So inside a combi boiler it would never experience buildup?
--
It turns out that several protected, rare birds in Germany have been feeding on a species of protected, rare fish. In response to this dilemma, exasperated German officials have decided to do the only thing that makes sense in this kind of a situation - kill all the environmentalists.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:17:32 UTC
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Post by Martin Brown
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
It is also expensive and only really matters for some things like making
tea - too much calcium and you get a layer of brown scum on top. The
right hardness matters for coffee too but only affects the taste.
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Some of them do nothing at all. The magnetic snake oil variety.
The real water softening filters swap calcium ions for sodium and have
to be replaced or recharged from time to time. It is a waste softening
water unless it is for drinking or some other critical usage that
requires soft water. Hard water doesn't corrode pipes and may even seal
minor pinhole leaks - which is a benefit for the water company.
I was thinking more of clogging up combi boilers.
--
Customer explaining flooded car to insurance claim investigator:
"It didn't look that deep at first glance - it only came half way up the ducks."
Frank
2017-10-12 13:14:39 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 13:21:27 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
You'd think anyone posting here would know that, wouldn't you.
--
The EU Parliament. The only parliament in the world that can neither initiate
nor repeal legislation.

Robert Kimbell
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:28:39 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
You'd think anyone posting here would know that, wouldn't you.
Not me, I live in Scotland where we have soft water. I was just asking out of interest.
--
In 1272, the Arabic Muslims invented the condom, using a goat's lower intestine.
In 1873, the British refined the idea by taking the intestine out of the goat first.
Frank
2017-10-12 13:45:48 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your
house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium.  You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
You'd think anyone posting here would know that, wouldn't you.
Everyone should know but when you hear that maybe 20% of a population is
functionally illiterate, i.e. cannot read beyond road signs or newspaper
headline, it makes one think that technical illiteracy is even higher.

Might also have mentioned reverse osmosis which even less probably
understand and is a filtration of sorts and more expensive process.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:54:42 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by Tim Streater
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your
house? Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
You'd think anyone posting here would know that, wouldn't you.
Everyone should know but when you hear that maybe 20% of a population is
functionally illiterate, i.e. cannot read beyond road signs or newspaper
headline, it makes one think that technical illiteracy is even higher.
What has literacy to do with knowing how a device works?
Post by Frank
Might also have mentioned reverse osmosis which even less probably
understand and is a filtration of sorts and more expensive process.
I saw something on the telly 10 yers ago that it was going to replace all filters.
--
Take some good advice: Never try to baptize your cat.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:29:08 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
--
Einstein married his cousin, Elsa Lowenthal, after his first marriage failed in 1919.
At the time he stated that he was attracted to Elsa "because she was so well endowed".
He postulated that if you are attracted to women with large breasts, the attraction is even stronger if there is a DNA connection.
This came to be known as.... Einstein's Theory of "Relative Titty."
Frank
2017-10-12 13:54:06 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium.  You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google. DYI system as low as $500, professional installation
$1,000 to $3,000. Then annual cost of the salt.

Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units that
some think work but actually don't:

https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:57:54 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google. DYI system as low as $500, professional installation
$1,000 to $3,000. Then annual cost of the salt.
Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units that
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it. Fair enough.
--
Computers are like air conditioners: They stop working when you open Windows.
Frank
2017-10-12 14:30:08 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water,
the
salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium.  You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google.  DYI system as low as $500, professional installation
$1,000 to $3,000.  Then annual cost of the salt.
Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units that
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it.
Fair enough.
Have no idea what people pay there since I'm on a well. I think around
here it would cost me $50 to $100/month for water and I think that is
expensive as we have lots of water.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:54:52 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for=
you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that =
a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to=
be
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles fr=
om a
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard wate=
r,
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
the
salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto=
the
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate =
out -
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
*that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the=
calcium in the water for sodium. You must regenerate the resin by=
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google. DYI system as low as $500, professional installatio=
n
$1,000 to $3,000. Then annual cost of the salt.
Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units th=
at
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installatio=
n-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it=
.
Fair enough.
Have no idea what people pay there since I'm on a well. I think aroun=
d
here it would cost me $50 to $100/month for water and I think that is
expensive as we have lots of water.
It's =A320 a month here. Flat rate use as much as you like. Price incl=
udes sewage.

-- =

Einstein married his cousin, Elsa Lowenthal, after his first marriage fa=
iled in 1919.
At the time he stated that he was attracted to Elsa "because she was so =
well endowed".
He postulated that if you are attracted to women with large breasts, the=
attraction is even stronger if there is a DNA connection.
This came to be known as.... Einstein's Theory of "Relative Titty."
Frank
2017-10-12 16:35:06 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles
from a
liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water,
the
salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto
the
pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate
out -
*that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium.  You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google.  DYI system as low as $500, professional installation
$1,000 to $3,000.  Then annual cost of the salt.
Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units that
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it.
Fair enough.
Have no idea what people pay there since I'm on a well.  I think around
here it would cost me $50 to $100/month for water and I think that is
expensive as we have lots of water.
It's £20 a month here.  Flat rate use as much as you like.  Price
includes sewage.
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live. Hard to
compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours are
highly subsidized. Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water.
I've heard of people here that had a water hose left on and ended up
with over $1,000 monthly bill.
Bod
2017-10-12 16:46:26 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles
from a
liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water,
the
salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves
onto the
pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate
out -
*that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
They are not filters but ion exchange resin beds that exchange the
calcium in the water for sodium.  You must regenerate the resin by
adding salt to flush out calcium to sewer.
How much does it cost to do this, compared to your water bill?
Easy to google.  DYI system as low as $500, professional installation
$1,000 to $3,000.  Then annual cost of the salt.
Here's interesting reference which even discusses the phony units that
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it.
Fair enough.
Have no idea what people pay there since I'm on a well.  I think around
here it would cost me $50 to $100/month for water and I think that is
expensive as we have lots of water.
It's £20 a month here.  Flat rate use as much as you like.  Price
includes sewage.
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live.  Hard to
compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours are
highly subsidized.  Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water. I've
heard of people here that had a water hose left on and ended up with
over $1,000 monthly bill.
No subsidies, all of our Utility companies are private...as far as I know.
--
Bod
NY
2017-10-12 17:03:15 UTC
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Post by Frank
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live. Hard to
compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours are
highly subsidized. Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water. I've
heard of people here that had a water hose left on and ended up with over
$1,000 monthly bill.
Water companies are encouraging people to change over from flat-rate to
metered supply, but there are some houses which can't have a meter. Our
house is one of a terrace of three. There is a single T from the water main
in the road, with a single stop tap, and this then divides into one pipe per
house. For some reason, the water company cannot fit meters in each of the
separate pipes, so we must always remain on a flat-rate tariff.

At my previous house which had a meter, the copper pipe going to the outside
tap pulled out of the compression fitting and a lot of water was lost - it
may have been running for several days because I'd been away for that
weekend. I kept a record of my meter readings every few weeks and I can see
that between 2 June and 1 July that year I used an average of 1600
litres/day
instead of typically about 50 - 100 litres/day. Ouch! Luckily my next bill
was
not much higher, so I imagine that the standing charges are a significant
part of the quarterly bill, and the extra water usage was not too
significant. I have heard of people being able to claim back the amount from
their household or buildings insurance in extreme cases so they don't lose
out.
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 17:03:02 UTC
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In article <oro5jt$44l$***@dont-email.me>, Frank < "@frank.net> wrote:

[snip]
Post by Frank
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live. Hard to
compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours are
highly subsidised. Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water.
That's just historical, when the Water Boards didn't do any maintenance
on the system and allowed the public to think that because water falls
from the sky, there was no reason for it to cost anything in which case
we could have as much as we like for no cost.

Y'know, it's the same sensible reasoning that gives us free unlimited
petrol for our cars.

Since privatisation, when some sanity entered the system, maintenance
started to be done again, people have started having water meters. We
got one here as it reduced our water bill.
--
"The problem with defending the purity of the English language is that English
is about as pure as a cribhouse whore. We don't just borrow words; on occasion,
English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious
and rifle their pockets for new vocabulary." -- James Nicoll, rasfw
Bod
2017-10-12 17:09:36 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
[snip]
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live.  Hard
to compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours
are highly subsidised.  Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water.
That's just historical, when the Water Boards didn't do any maintenance
on the system and allowed the public to think that because water falls
from the sky, there was no reason for it to cost anything in which case
we could have as much as we like for no cost.
Y'know, it's the same sensible reasoning that gives us free unlimited
petrol for our cars.
Since privatisation, when some sanity entered the system, maintenance
started to be done again, people have started having water meters. We
got one here as it reduced our water bill.
We're not on a water meter.
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 17:10:23 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Tim Streater
[snip]
Excellent rate and that would just pay for sewer where I live.  Hard
to compare utility prices between US and UK as I suspect most of yours
are highly subsidised.  Hard to believe they allow you unlimited water.
That's just historical, when the Water Boards didn't do any maintenance
on the system and allowed the public to think that because water falls
from the sky, there was no reason for it to cost anything in which case
we could have as much as we like for no cost.
Y'know, it's the same sensible reasoning that gives us free unlimited
petrol for our cars.
Since privatisation, when some sanity entered the system, maintenance
started to be done again, people have started having water meters. We
got one here as it reduced our water bill.
We're not on a water meter.
Perhaps you should look into it.
--
"That excessive bail ought not to be required, nor excessive fines imposed,
nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted" -- Bill of Rights 1689
Ed Pawlowski
2017-10-12 17:12:20 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Frank
https://www.homeadvisor.com/cost/kitchens/water-softener-installation-costs/
So about a third of the existing water bill again if they softened it.
Fair enough.
Have no idea what people pay there since I'm on a well.  I think around
here it would cost me $50 to $100/month for water and I think that is
expensive as we have lots of water.
I pay about $800 a year for water and sewer combined. Decent quality,
good pressure, 100% reliable.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:00:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Exactly that.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:13:22 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Exactly that.
What are you protecting? As you said it's good for you.
--
Depression is merely anger without enthusiasm.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:15:35 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Exactly that.
What are you protecting?   As you said it's good for you.
Well the lime is still present but tends not to stick so much to pipes etc.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:23:16 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by NY
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
I would thought this is for two reasons: cost and the fact that a small
amount of the salts which cause limescale is actually thought to be
beneficial to the human body.
And it's not filtration, which the removal of solid particles from a liquid
by a fine mesh (metal, paper, ceramic). In the case of hard water, the salts
are dissolved in the water and gradually deposit themselves onto the pipes
in your house. You'd need a chemical reaction in the treatment plant to
convert the salts to something insoluble that would precipitate out - *that*
precipitate could be separated by filtration.
So what do "filters" for preventing limescale buildup do in your house?
Make sure it stays dissolved?
Exactly that.
What are you protecting? As you said it's good for you.
Well the lime is still present but tends not to stick so much to pipes etc.
Elsewhere in the thread someone said you needed air for it to deposit.
--
I got invited to a party and was told to dress to kill. Apparently a turban, beard and a backpack wasn't what they had in mind.
charles
2017-10-12 12:46:59 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 12:57:48 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes? Why not do this filtering earlier?
--
Ederacinism - sexual pleasure derived from the thought of tearing out one's sex organs by the roots.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:00:10 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the limescale
which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have one fitted
to our mains water.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:13:00 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Bod
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes? Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the limescale
which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have one fitted
to our mains water.
So yours isn't the type mentioned in this thread (nd presumably in a dishwasher) where you constantly supply several pounds of salt?
--
I am sorry I offended you - I should have lied.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:14:14 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Bod
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the limescale
which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have one fitted
to our mains water.
So yours isn't the type mentioned in this thread (nd presumably in a
dishwasher) where you constantly supply several pounds of salt?
Correct.
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 16:41:44 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the limescale
which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have one fitted
to our mains water.
What d'ye mean "breaks it up"? Are there little imps with miniature
hammers who swim up and down the pipes chipping bits of limescale off?
--
"Hard" and "Soft" Brexit are code words for Leaving or Staying in the EU,
rather than for the terms of our departure.

Jacob Rees-Mogg MP
Bod
2017-10-12 16:48:47 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the
limescale which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have
one fitted to our mains water.
What d'ye mean "breaks it up"? Are there little imps with miniature
hammers who swim up and down the pipes chipping bits of limescale off?
Of course.
--
Bod
Bod
2017-10-12 16:54:10 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the
limescale which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have
one fitted to our mains water.
What d'ye mean "breaks it up"? Are there little imps with miniature
hammers who swim up and down the pipes chipping bits of limescale off?
This is what we've got:

https://www.screwfix.com/p/liff-electrolytic-in-line-scale-inhibitor-15mm/91448?kpid=91448&ds_rl=1245250&gclid=CjwKCAjwpfzOBRA5EiwAU0ccNwhUZzM1KLZghq60mx8YUtxpv9T7ef8Mbs_kLNmOv6Z3_6kVJQ2j7hoCmccQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CN3w0tvF69YCFUYh0wodLlYCQA
--
Bod
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 17:07:04 UTC
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Post by Tim Streater
Post by Bod
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Then WTF is a limescale filter that people fit into their homes?  Why
not do this filtering earlier?
A hard water filter is not exactly a filter, it breaks up the
limescale which reduces the amount of limescale in your pipes. I have
one fitted to our mains water.
What d'ye mean "breaks it up"? Are there little imps with miniature
hammers who swim up and down the pipes chipping bits of limescale off?
<https://www.screwfix.com/p/liff-electrolytic-in-line-scale-inhibitor-15mm/91448?kpid=91448&ds_rl=1245250&gclid=CjwKCAjwpfzOBRA5EiwAU0ccNwhUZzM1KLZghq60mx8YUtxpv9T7ef8Mbs_kLNmOv6Z3_6kVJQ2j7hoCmccQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CN3w0tvF69YCFUYh0wodLlYCQA>
I've added <> to your long URL. You're welcome.

Now: how is that thing supposed to work?
--
Lady Astor: "If you were my husband I'd give you poison." Churchill: "If
you were my wife, I'd drink it."
Ed Pawlowski
2017-10-12 14:16:50 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
It could be softened but that is not the way to do it. You don't need
soft water to flush toilets, water the garden, etc so it seems silly to
pay the expense of treating it all.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:24:01 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
It could be softened but that is not the way to do it. You don't need
soft water to flush toilets, water the garden, etc so it seems silly to
pay the expense of treating it all.
Does it not clog the cistern?
--
"If women are so bloody perfect at multitasking,
How come they can't have a headache and sex at the same time?" - Bill Connolly
NY
2017-10-12 16:08:06 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Ed Pawlowski
It could be softened but that is not the way to do it. You don't need
soft water to flush toilets, water the garden, etc so it seems silly to
pay the expense of treating it all.
Does it not clog the cistern?
After many years of use, my parents' cistern had a limscale tide mark round
it - in fact it had several where the cutoff had been set at different
levels. Being a porcelain cistern (unglazed on the inside), the limescale
clung very tenaciously and couldn't be removed, so we left it. The toilet
still flushed fine. With a plastic cistern you can chip the scale off as
long as you do it frequently and don't let too much build up.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:26:26 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
It could be softened but that is not the way to do it.  You don't need
soft water to flush toilets, water the garden, etc so it seems silly to
pay the expense of treating it all.
Agreed.
--
Bod
tim...
2017-10-12 16:03:54 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
It could be softened but that is not the way to do it. You don't need
soft water to flush toilets, water the garden,
you don't need it to drink either - it tastes awful

tim
Tim+
2017-10-12 14:58:30 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Filtering doesn't remove the lime content of water
Notice who you’re replying to...

Tim
--
Please don't feed the trolls
Cindy Hamilton
2017-10-12 13:16:59 UTC
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Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well. Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.

Cindy Hamilton
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 13:28:01 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well. Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Depends where you live. I don't know about the US, but in the UK only the south half has hard water.
--
In case of exposure to lack of substance, please do not continue to refrain from stopping.
Bod
2017-10-12 14:02:50 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:16:59 +0100, Cindy Hamilton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well.  Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Depends where you live.  I don't know about the US, but in the UK only
the south half has hard water.
Cornwall and Devon have soft water and that's in the south.
--
Bod
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:13:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Bod
On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 14:16:59 +0100, Cindy Hamilton
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well. Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Depends where you live. I don't know about the US, but in the UK only
the south half has hard water.
Cornwall and Devon have soft water and that's in the south.
I'd forgotten about them. But AFAIK anything from Yorkshire upwards is soft.
--
If it weren't for electricity, we'd all be watching television by candlelight. -- Geroge Gobel
Frank
2017-10-12 13:58:58 UTC
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Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well. Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Cindy Hamilton
I have a well and decided not to treat as calcium is borderline. If I
had treated, as next door neighbor did, when he sold his house found
that he needed an extra drainage field dug for the exchanger flush as
salt is harmful to septic systems. Probably hastens concrete erosion as
you will observe if you ever used sodium chloride on your concrete walk
to melt ice.
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-10-12 14:14:49 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by Cindy Hamilton
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well. Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Cindy Hamilton
I have a well and decided not to treat as calcium is borderline. If I
had treated, as next door neighbor did, when he sold his house found
that he needed an extra drainage field dug for the exchanger flush as
salt is harmful to septic systems. Probably hastens concrete erosion as
you will observe if you ever used sodium chloride on your concrete walk
to melt ice.
Septic system, ugh! I'm glad we have a proper sewage outlet here.
--
Why was the nigger with diarrea freaking out?
He thought he was melting!
Frank
2017-10-12 14:34:19 UTC
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Post by Frank
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for
you?   It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
More than 15 million U.S. households have their own well.  Some
of them don't see fit to treat their water for calcium.
Cindy Hamilton
I have a well and decided not to treat as calcium is borderline. If I
had treated, as next door neighbor did, when he sold his house found
that he needed an extra drainage field dug for the exchanger flush as
salt is harmful to septic systems.  Probably hastens concrete erosion as
you will observe if you ever used sodium chloride on your concrete walk
to melt ice.
Septic system, ugh!  I'm glad we have a proper sewage outlet here.
When small development was built we had no access to water or sewer
system. Lots of about one acre can have well and septic if septic
drainage is approved.
BurfordTJustice
2017-10-12 13:43:45 UTC
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Why not ask on one of your UK groups??

After all you are a Brit in the UK
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
--
I took my Biology exam last Friday. I was asked to name two things
commonly found in cells. Apparently "Blacks" and "Scousers" were not the
correct answers.
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 13:47:58 UTC
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Post by BurfordTJustice
Why not ask on one of your UK groups??
After all you are a Brit in the UK
This *is* a UK group.
--
The truth of the matter is that we Scots have always been more divided amongst
ourselves than pitted against the English. Scottish history before the Union of
Parliaments is a gloomy, violent tale of murders, feuds, and tribal revenge.
Only after the Act of Union did Highlanders and Lowlanders, Picts and Celts,
begin to recognise one another as fellow citizens.

Tam Dalyell
BurfordTJustice
2017-10-12 13:50:54 UTC
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This isnot, fucktard...
,alt.home.repair



You don't even know where you are replying to.
Post by Tim Streater
Post by BurfordTJustice
Why not ask on one of your UK groups??
After all you are a Brit in the UK
This *is* a UK group.
--
The truth of the matter is that we Scots have always been more divided amongst
ourselves than pitted against the English. Scottish history before the Union of
Parliaments is a gloomy, violent tale of murders, feuds, and tribal revenge.
Only after the Act of Union did Highlanders and Lowlanders, Picts and Celts,
begin to recognise one another as fellow citizens.
Tam Dalyell
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-10-12 14:59:32 UTC
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Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?   It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!

Obviously a dumb limey...
Bod
2017-10-12 15:19:13 UTC
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Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Members | Water UK
https://www.water.org.uk/about/our-members
Water UK is funded directly by its members and overall policy is set by
our member companies, working through the *Water UK Board* and Council
of Members.
--
Bod
NY
2017-10-12 16:11:59 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Members | Water UK
https://www.water.org.uk/about/our-members
Water UK is funded directly by its members and overall policy is set by
our member companies, working through the *Water UK Board* and Council of
Members.
Standard UK usage, maybe slightly old-fashioned, to refer to the supplier of
a service (water, electricity or gas) as "the water board", "the electricity
board" or "the gas board". I think this usage probably changed when a single
supplier for the whole country's water, electricity or gas was replaced by
separate companies when the industries were privatised and de-regulated by
Maggie Thatcher in the 1980s - as in the famous "If you see Sid, tell him"
TV adverts which I think were for shares in the newly-privatised gas
companies.
Bod
2017-10-12 16:19:10 UTC
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Post by NY
Post by Bod
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?
It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Members | Water UK
https://www.water.org.uk/about/our-members
Water UK is funded directly by its members and overall policy is set
by our member companies, working through the *Water UK Board* and
Council of Members.
Standard UK usage, maybe slightly old-fashioned, to refer to the
supplier of a service (water, electricity or gas) as "the water board",
"the electricity board" or "the gas board". I think this usage probably
changed when a single supplier for the whole country's water,
electricity or gas was replaced by separate companies when the
industries were privatised and de-regulated by Maggie Thatcher in the
1980s - as in the famous "If you see Sid, tell him" TV adverts which I
think were for shares in the newly-privatised gas companies.
Ah yes, I'm still looking for Sid :-)
--
Bod
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2017-10-12 16:49:54 UTC
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Post by Bod
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Members | Water UK
https://www.water.org.uk/about/our-members
Water UK is funded directly by its members and overall policy is set by our member companies, working through the *Water UK Board* and Council of Members.
Oh, well, pardon.
I thought someone said a board, like a waterboard.
Well, fuck me Jean I'll not smile again!
NY
2017-10-12 17:04:43 UTC
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Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Post by Bod
Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you? It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Members | Water UK
https://www.water.org.uk/about/our-members
Water UK is funded directly by its members and overall policy is set by
our member companies, working through the *Water UK Board* and Council of
Members.
Oh, well, pardon.
I thought someone said a board, like a waterboard.
Well, fuck me Jean I'll not smile again!
I nearly added to my previous post "water board - not to be confused with
waterboarding which is a form of torture" :-)
Tim Streater
2017-10-12 16:44:20 UTC
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Post by Colonel Edmund J. Burke
Why don't water boards in hard water areas filter the water for you?   It
would save their own pipes getting scaled up too.
Water boards?
LOL!
Obviously a dumb limey...
Dumb, yes, And 30 years out of date, too. Limey? Yes, be good if we
could coat him in limescale, might shut the bar-steward up.
--
Socialism: For people who lack the charisma to be train spotters.

Ann Sheridan
Peeler
2017-10-12 17:18:41 UTC
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On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 13:12:23 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
the pathological attention whore of all the uk ngs, blathered again:

<FLUSH the attention-starved bitch's inevitable attention-baiting bullshit
unread again>
--
More from Birdbrain Macaw's (now "James Wilkinson" LOL) weird sociopathic
world:
"The entire world has been fucked over by the disabled. They think they
have the right to be able to go everywhere in their chairs. Fucking ramps
everywhere, extra expense for all. Parking spaces marked disabled
everywhere (although they're handy as they're always empty for me to use)."
MID: <***@red.lan>
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