Discussion:
splitting axe/maul
(too old to reply)
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-04 11:51:34 UTC
Permalink
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks

Don
HeyBub
2011-10-04 11:56:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of
wood but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a
file to it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate.
Helpfull ones would be better than snide remarks
Are you trying to chop the wood into manageable lengths or split it?

If the former, buy or rent a chain saw. If the latter, you're pretty much
screwed. Look here for some ideas:
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=log
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-04 12:02:17 UTC
Permalink
it's been cut to length i want to split it
Post by HeyBub
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of
wood but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a
file to it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate.
Helpfull ones would be better than snide remarks
Are you trying to chop the wood into manageable lengths or split it?
If the former, buy or rent a chain saw. If the latter, you're pretty much
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=log
Doug Miller
2011-10-04 12:44:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
it's been cut to length i want to split it
Get someone who has done it before to show you how. That's the best way
to learn.
Post by don &/or Lucille
Post by HeyBub
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of
wood but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a
file to it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate.
Helpfull ones would be better than snide remarks
Are you trying to chop the wood into manageable lengths or split it?
If the former, buy or rent a chain saw. If the latter, you're pretty much
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=log
aemeijers
2011-10-04 20:43:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
it's been cut to length i want to split it
Post by HeyBub
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of
wood but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a
file to it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate.
Helpfull ones would be better than snide remarks
Are you trying to chop the wood into manageable lengths or split it?
If the former, buy or rent a chain saw. If the latter, you're pretty much
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=log
Rent or borrow a splitter. After you go through the process once, and
see how long the woodpile lasts, you will be better able to decide if
you ever want to mess with it again. Used ones are often available on
CraigsList, from people who decided that splitting their own, or fires
in general, just were not worth the hassle. Prepping raw logs, even
already the right length, is a lot of work. No woman in the house for
the romance factor, so I ignore my fireplace- I'd rather heat with the
gas furnace. In my case, furnace is probably cheaper anyway, since all I
have is a crappy metal prefab fireplace, not a real wood-burning stove.

Being hard to split, is the tree's final revenge for being cut down.
--
aem sends...
Dave M.
2011-10-04 12:15:07 UTC
Permalink
Don,

YouTube has plenty of videos on splitting wood with mauls axes, wedges et
c. Watch some.
Expect to be tired the next day. Splitting firewood is hard work.

Dave M.
Don Phillipson
2011-10-04 12:18:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Seasoned wood (which has partly dried out and thus
developed cracks) is usually easier to split than freshly
cut "green" wood. (I do a couple of cords every year
with a 5 lb. axe, deliberately blunt, preferred over a maul.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
jamesgangnc
2011-10-04 12:25:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
Sounds like your wood is still pretty green. Let it dry some more.
Or rent a splitter.
Doug Miller
2011-10-04 12:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by jamesgangnc
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
Sounds like your wood is still pretty green. Let it dry some more.
Or rent a splitter.
That's not necessarily the problem; many woods split just fine when
green. I still think the best thing the OP can do is get a friend who's
done it before to show him how.
Stormin Mormon
2011-10-04 12:34:07 UTC
Permalink
When wood is freshly cut, and "green", it is
much harder to split. If you stack the wood
some where dry, and wait a year, it will be a
lot easier to split.

Some folks use electric or gasoline powered
log splitter, which may have more power.

You may get better results with a sledge hammer,
and wedge. Set the wood on end (flat surface up).
Put the wedge on the top flat end, and pound it
in with a sledge hammer.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"don &/or Lucille" <***@nf.sympatico.ca> wrote in
message news:4e8af344$0$5390$***@news.aliant.net...
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a
truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a
file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones
would be better
than snide remarks

Don
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 12:57:41 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Do you know what kind of wood it is? If it is something like
twisted elm or cypress, it won't split without some hydraulics. If
it is oak, you just need a strong swing. [and a dull axe is fine for
splitting]

Seasoned wood splits easier. Hard to split wood becomes easier
when the frost is in it.

Don't try to slit a 12" diameter log by whacking it in the center.
Take slabs off the outside edges and work your way in.

Make a good splitting platform. [a stump works fine.]

Do a little at a time. You'll be using some muscles that haven't
gotten a workout in your lifetime.

Jim
Harry K
2011-10-04 14:50:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Do you know what kind of wood it is?     If it is something like
twisted elm or cypress, it won't split without some hydraulics.   If
it is oak, you just need a strong swing. [and a dull axe is fine for
splitting]
Curious. What is the reasoning behind the "dull ax bit"? That just
makes the work harder.
<snip>

Harry K
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-04 15:25:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry K
Curious. What is the reasoning behind the "dull ax bit"? That just
makes the work harder.
<snip>
Harry K
From experience, the sharp blades want to cut in and stay while the duller
blade pushes the wood apart better.
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 15:45:00 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 07:50:48 -0700 (PDT), Harry K
Post by Harry K
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Do you know what kind of wood it is?     If it is something like
twisted elm or cypress, it won't split without some hydraulics.   If
it is oak, you just need a strong swing. [and a dull axe is fine for
splitting]
Curious. What is the reasoning behind the "dull ax bit"? That just
makes the work harder.
<snip>
When I used such things, my felling axe was sharp enough to shave my
arm. I never touched the splitting axe with a file in 30 years. A
sharp splitting axe is more likely to bury itself in a log without
splitting it. It splits by force & inertia, not by cutting.

Jim
Harry K
2011-10-05 03:37:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 07:50:48 -0700 (PDT), Harry K
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Do you know what kind of wood it is?     If it is something like
twisted elm or cypress, it won't split without some hydraulics.   If
it is oak, you just need a strong swing. [and a dull axe is fine for
splitting]
Curious.  What is the reasoning behind the "dull ax bit"?  That just
makes the work harder.
<snip>
When I used such things, my felling axe was sharp enough to shave my
arm.     I never touched the splitting axe with a file in 30 years.  A
sharp splitting axe is more likely to bury itself in a log without
splitting it.      It splits by force & inertia, not by cutting.
Jim- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Sorry but you are both wrong. If you know anyone with a Fiskars
splitting ax, try one and you will forget about "dull" axes. Fact is
that wood will not split until the ax/maul _enters_ the wood and dull
one uses up force just gettin into the wood. If you watch a hydraulic
spliter at work you will see that the 'edge' never touches the wood
after it enters the piece - the split runs ahead of of it...unless, of
course, it is shearing through a knot. It is the same with an ax,
maul, or wedge.

I have both a dull maul and a sharp, sharp Fiskars that outsplits the
maul and does it with way less effort. Best $50 I ever spent.

Harry K
k***@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz
2011-10-05 23:31:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry K
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Do you know what kind of wood it is?     If it is something like
twisted elm or cypress, it won't split without some hydraulics.   If
it is oak, you just need a strong swing. [and a dull axe is fine for
splitting]
Curious. What is the reasoning behind the "dull ax bit"? That just
makes the work harder.
<snip>
The idea is to "split" the fibers apart, not cut them.
Frank
2011-10-04 13:05:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK. You don't want to burn all kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.

Splitting depends on type of wood. I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
hr(bob) hofmann@att.net
2011-10-04 13:35:26 UTC
Permalink
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK.  You don't want to burn all kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood.  I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and start
there. I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim Elbrecht
said.
RonB
2011-10-04 14:48:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK.  You don't want to burn all kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood.  I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and start
there.  I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim Elbrecht
said.
One thing a lot of folks overlook is standing the chunk on end on a
solid surface - preferably a large piece of un-split firewood. This
does two things:

1) Reduces the cushion effect of the blow. A solid base puts the
force of the ax or maul into the wood,not softer earth.

2) Safer. With the work elevated you are less apt to have the ax
bounce off and end up hitting your foot or leg (bad!)

#2 is another reason to follow Doug's advice. You can get hurt,
seriously hurt, splitting wood; and the tireder you get the higher the
probability of accident.


You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.

RonB
HeyBub
2011-10-04 20:20:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by RonB
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time
cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to
it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull
ones would be better than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK. You don't want to burn all
kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood. I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and
start there. I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim
Elbrecht said.
One thing a lot of folks overlook is standing the chunk on end on a
solid surface - preferably a large piece of un-split firewood. This
1) Reduces the cushion effect of the blow. A solid base puts the
force of the ax or maul into the wood,not softer earth.
2) Safer. With the work elevated you are less apt to have the ax
bounce off and end up hitting your foot or leg (bad!)
#2 is another reason to follow Doug's advice. You can get hurt,
seriously hurt, splitting wood; and the tireder you get the higher the
probability of accident.
You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.
Just wondering...

Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack? I'm thinking
a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.

You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.

Oh well, just a thought...
Oren
2011-10-04 20:31:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Post by RonB
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time
cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to
it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull
ones would be better than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK. You don't want to burn all
kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood. I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and
start there. I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim
Elbrecht said.
One thing a lot of folks overlook is standing the chunk on end on a
solid surface - preferably a large piece of un-split firewood. This
1) Reduces the cushion effect of the blow. A solid base puts the
force of the ax or maul into the wood,not softer earth.
2) Safer. With the work elevated you are less apt to have the ax
bounce off and end up hitting your foot or leg (bad!)
#2 is another reason to follow Doug's advice. You can get hurt,
seriously hurt, splitting wood; and the tireder you get the higher the
probability of accident.
You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack? I'm thinking
a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
Oh well, just a thought...
See:

<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200442241_200442241>

Cheaper:

<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200338643_200338643>
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 21:16:55 UTC
Permalink
Oren <***@127.0.0.1> wrote:

-snip-
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200442241_200442241>
IMO- That's just plain silly. First choice is get wood that
splits-- but if that isn't possible, I'd probably break down and get
a motorized splitter.

I'm 60 yrs old and haven't swung an axe for more than a dozen swings
in 10 years. But I'll bet I can split a cord of decent wood with
a splitting axe faster than somebody can operate that $170.
contraption.
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200338643_200338643>
And unless you have no use of your arms at all, that one seems even
sillier.

Anybody that has used either of those devices- or similar- feel free
to correct me. [and if you've got the tool and a wood pile within
100 miles of Schenectady, I'd love to come out and split some wood for
you just to see them work]

Jim
Oren
2011-10-04 21:35:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
-snip-
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200442241_200442241>
IMO- That's just plain silly. First choice is get wood that
splits-- but if that isn't possible, I'd probably break down and get
a motorized splitter.
I'm 60 yrs old and haven't swung an axe for more than a dozen swings
in 10 years. But I'll bet I can split a cord of decent wood with
a splitting axe faster than somebody can operate that $170.
contraption.
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200338643_200338643>
And unless you have no use of your arms at all, that one seems even
sillier.
Anybody that has used either of those devices- or similar- feel free
to correct me. [and if you've got the tool and a wood pile within
100 miles of Schenectady, I'd love to come out and split some wood for
you just to see them work]
Jim
First, I'm allergic to (work) splitting logs.

Second, I cannot attest to the veracity of the tools and refuse to
work with one.

<G>
Stormin Mormon
2011-10-05 11:58:38 UTC
Permalink
I have neither wood stove, nor splitter. However, I'd accept
your kind offer, if I could.

I'm guessing you are healthier than most of the television
generation couch potatos. I'd also not want to see you in a
bar fight, with your strong shoulders and upper body.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Jim Elbrecht" <***@email.com> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...


I'm 60 yrs old and haven't swung an axe for more than a
dozen swings
in 10 years. But I'll bet I can split a cord of decent
wood with
a splitting axe faster than somebody can operate that $170.
contraption.

Anybody that has used either of those devices- or similar-
feel free
to correct me. [and if you've got the tool and a wood pile
within
100 miles of Schenectady, I'd love to come out and split
some wood for
you just to see them work]

Jim
Harry K
2011-10-05 14:40:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
-snip-
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200442241_200442241>
IMO- That's just plain silly.     First choice is get wood that
splits--  but if that isn't possible, I'd probably break down and get
a motorized splitter.
I'm 60 yrs old and haven't swung an axe for more than a dozen swings
in 10 years.      But I'll bet I can split a cord of decent wood with
a splitting axe faster than somebody can operate that $170.
contraption.
Post by Oren
<http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200338643_200338643>
And unless you have no use of your arms at all, that one seems even
sillier.  
Anybody that has used either of those devices- or similar- feel free
to correct me.   [and if you've got the tool and a wood pile within
100 miles of Schenectady, I'd love to come out and split some wood for
you just to see them work]
Jim
I'm 77 and I think I could split wood faster with a hammer and chisel
than that asinine rig. I saw a promotional video of one back when the
first one showed up on the scene. I counted 7 strokes to split a
stove size piece in half. Clear grain and it could have been split
with a small hatchet with one swing.

There is a place for it for someone who is so disabled that it is the
only tool they could operate.

Harry K
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-04 21:09:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack? I'm
thinking a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
Oh well, just a thought...
Sure, same idea as a hydraulic with engine powered pump. Horizontal is
better though, so you don't have to lift the wood.
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 21:26:25 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 15:20:27 -0500, "HeyBub" <***@NOSPAMgmail.com>
wrote:


-snip-
Post by HeyBub
Post by RonB
You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack? I'm thinking
a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
I like Oren's idea better-- [buy one already built] but I don't think
you'd gain anything but a new toy to play with. See my answer to
him.

Jim
Steve B
2011-10-04 22:07:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack? I'm
thinking a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
Oh well, just a thought...
VERY doable, just S-L-O-W!

Steve
Harry K
2011-10-05 03:39:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Post by RonB
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time
cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to
it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull
ones would be better than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK. You don't want to burn all
kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood. I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and
start there. I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim
Elbrecht said.
One thing a lot of folks overlook is standing the chunk on end on a
solid surface - preferably a large piece of un-split firewood.  This
1) Reduces the cushion effect of the blow.  A solid base puts the
force of the ax or maul into the wood,not softer earth.
2)  Safer.  With the work elevated you are less apt to have the ax
bounce off and end up hitting your foot or leg (bad!)
#2 is another reason to follow Doug's advice.  You can get hurt,
seriously hurt, splitting wood; and the tireder you get the higher the
probability of accident.
You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend.   A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack?  I'm thinking
a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
Oh well, just a thought...- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Available on line, I think Harbor Frieght has them, unless one is
physically handicapped they are useless. Takes forever to split one
piece.

Harry K
harry
2011-10-05 06:45:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by HeyBub
Post by RonB
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
On 10/4/2011 7:51 AM, don &/or Lucille wrote:> Help my first time
cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
Post by don &/or Lucille
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to
it but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull
ones would be better than snide remarks
Don
Maybe if already split it is OK. You don't want to burn all
kindling.
I had a neighbor that was never happy with wood he bought and cut it
down to stick size which is going to burn fast but not give a sustained
fire that does not require constant feeding.
Splitting depends on type of wood. I use ax, wedge and sledge hammer
when I have to on wood gathered from trees in my yard.
Doug Miller's advice is best, get someone who has done splitting to
show you how, it is much easier than learning by trial and error.
Also, examine the wood for any natural cracks or fault lines and
start there. I always sort of peel around the perimeter, as Jim
Elbrecht said.
One thing a lot of folks overlook is standing the chunk on end on a
solid surface - preferably a large piece of un-split firewood.  This
1) Reduces the cushion effect of the blow.  A solid base puts the
force of the ax or maul into the wood,not softer earth.
2)  Safer.  With the work elevated you are less apt to have the ax
bounce off and end up hitting your foot or leg (bad!)
#2 is another reason to follow Doug's advice.  You can get hurt,
seriously hurt, splitting wood; and the tireder you get the higher the
probability of accident.
You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend.   A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.
Just wondering...
Couldn't a home-made splitter be made using a hydraulic jack?  I'm thinking
a U-shaped bit of metal - with a wedge at the top.
You put the wood under the wedge and the jack under the wood.
Pump-pump-pump... and the log is split.
Oh well, just a thought...- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
Seems to be an American redneck tradition.

Steve B
2011-10-04 22:05:58 UTC
Permalink
"RonB" <***@yahoo.com> wrote

You can rent splitters - or better mooch splitter time from a
friend. A case of beer goes a long way toward reducing aching
muscles.

RonB

In man talk, a good friend owns a log splitter and knows how to brew beer.
And a reeeeeeeealy good friend has a boat, too.

Steve
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-04 14:31:30 UTC
Permalink
Birch splits fine if it doesnt have any knots rest of it the axe will only
scar it
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Don
beecrofter
2011-10-04 14:50:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
If it is the file bouning off the steel of the maul try a belt sander.

If it is the maul bouncing off the rounds of wood then start with ones
that have obvious cracks or the smallest ones first until you get the
hang of it.
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-04 15:23:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Don
I see it has been mentioned about green wood. Some is very difficult to
split when wet so wait for at least a couple of weeks. You don't want the
blade too sharp either as it ill dig in as opposed to pushing the sides
apart.

Next is leverage. You want the blade to hit the wood at 90 degrees to the
handle, not near the bottom of the swing arc. Get a round of wood to use as
the base, then put the wood to be split on top of that,. You get a more
powerful and meaningful blow to the grain of the wood,.

Even better is to wait until the cold weather comes. After a long freeze,
the wood that is bouncing today will literally pop into two pieces with one
well placed hit.

Wear gloves and hard tipped shoes or boots, safety glasses.
Splitting wood is far better than paying to go to a gym.
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-04 15:38:11 UTC
Permalink
Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was thinking
it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks rather than
burning in junks. Any opiniuons?
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would
be better than snide remarks
Don
I see it has been mentioned about green wood. Some is very difficult to
split when wet so wait for at least a couple of weeks. You don't want the
blade too sharp either as it ill dig in as opposed to pushing the sides
apart.
Next is leverage. You want the blade to hit the wood at 90 degrees to the
handle, not near the bottom of the swing arc. Get a round of wood to use
as the base, then put the wood to be split on top of that,. You get a
more powerful and meaningful blow to the grain of the wood,.
Even better is to wait until the cold weather comes. After a long freeze,
the wood that is bouncing today will literally pop into two pieces with
one well placed hit.
Wear gloves and hard tipped shoes or boots, safety glasses.
Splitting wood is far better than paying to go to a gym.
Frank
2011-10-04 16:11:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was thinking
it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks rather than
burning in junks. Any opiniuons?
Not familiar with birch but it is a good idea to google up the fuel
value of various woods. The hard woods are usually best. I think
some like fat wood which is from a high resin pine stump makes good
fire starter but burning a lot of pine is a no no because of high
creosote build up.
Harry K
2011-10-05 03:27:09 UTC
Permalink
wrote:> Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was thinking
Post by don &/or Lucille
it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks rather than
burning in junks. Any opiniuons?
Not familiar with birch but it is a good idea to google up the fuel
value of various woods.  The hard woods are usually best.  I think
some like fat wood which is from a high resin pine stump makes good
fire starter but burning a lot of pine is a no no because of high
creosote build up.
Old wives tale. If the pine is cured well dthere is no creosote
problem any worse than any other wood, assuming one isn't burrning
with an oxygen starved fire. There are mny places where you heat with
pine, fir, spruce or you don't heat with wood at all.

Harry K
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-04 16:28:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was
thinking it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks
rather than burning in junks. Any opiniuons?
Easy is good.

Hickory is a bear to split so leave that in big chunks to burn all night.
Red oak splits pretty clean.
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-04 16:54:36 UTC
Permalink
where can i find pictures of bark to see what types of wood i have only one
i know is birch!
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by don &/or Lucille
Heres another question. Birch splits along its grain so easy I was
thinking it would be best used for making kindling and smaller sticks
rather than burning in junks. Any opiniuons?
Easy is good.
Hickory is a bear to split so leave that in big chunks to burn all
night. Red oak splits pretty clean.
Frank
2011-10-04 17:59:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
where can i find pictures of bark to see what types of wood i have only one
i know is birch!
Not that easy to figure out.
Saw from this site:
http://www.keep-it-simple-firewood.com/firewood-types.html
That there are 4 different types of birch, couple burn good, couple poor.
Don't know what are predominant woods in your area and agree with cite
that says you should use trusted supplier.
My tree guy cut down a silver maple years ago and I saved $50 to keep
the wood. Was a bear to split and burned poorly. If it were good he
would have taken it to sell as firewood, but he does not sell crap.
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 18:23:37 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 13:54:36 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
where can i find pictures of bark to see what types of wood i have only one
i know is birch!
A few pictures of bark aren't going to tell you much. Can't/won't
the guy you bought it from tell you what it is?

It is pretty likely he'll either say 'I don't know" [which translates
to "find yourself another supplier" ]-- or he'll say 'there was birch,
maple, oak & poplar in the load I brought you'.

If he admits to selling you poplar, he's a keeper, but tell him you
don't need any poplar next time.

Some woods might take a *really* good look at bark texture and color,
wood color, grain structure, smell, and weight to tell what it is. If
you're in NY, the woods it could be will be a whole lot different from
the possibilities an west TX. [I see you have a ca address-- so NS to
Yukon]

And though it will be a PITA to learn all the woods that someone might
bring you-- if you're going to be buying wood, it is time well spent.

Jim
Oren
2011-10-04 17:32:02 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The ones I see in
the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped head.
Twayne
2011-10-05 13:05:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And in
all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation;
just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!

I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct
design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually
the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
hr(bob) hofmann@att.net
2011-10-05 13:44:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store  have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And in
all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation;
just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct
design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually
the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
And just what is that angle?
Twayne
2011-10-05 15:35:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by hr(bob) ***@att.net
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic
this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not
a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses &
the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine
wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time.
The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant
thing to get right regardless of what you want to
sharpen.
And just what is that angle?
The angle depends on what you're sharpening. I just measure them on new
parts or while parts are new, and record them but even a dull edge
measurement will get you into the ballpark. So in essence, copy whats there
to start with.
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-05 16:50:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
The angle depends on what you're sharpening. I just measure them on new
parts or while parts are new, and record them but even a dull edge
measurement will get you into the ballpark. So in essence, copy whats
there to start with.
Here is a good start
http://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/selecting-bevel-angle.aspx

Type of Knife or Tool Recommended Angle
Cleaver
Machete
30 - 35 Degrees

Hunting Knives
Pocket Knives
Survival Knives
Sport Knives
25 - 30 Degrees

Chef's Knives
Kitchen Knives
Smaller Knives
Boning Knives
Carving Knives
18 - 25 Degrees

Fillet Knives
Paring Knives
Razors
X-Acto Knives
12 - 18 Degrees
Steve B
2011-10-05 13:59:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And
in all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for
valdation/clarifcation; just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening
in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct
design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually
the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
Can we see your link for validation/clarification, please?

Steve
Twayne
2011-10-05 15:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic
this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not
a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses &
the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine
wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time.
The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant
thing to get right regardless of what you want to
sharpen.
Can we see your link for validation/clarification, please?
Steve
No, no one here deserves my putting in the Googles for it. I don't provide
them when no one else does or I have no good reason to; do your own research
now.
Steve B
2011-10-05 17:24:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
Post by Steve B
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic
this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not
a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses &
the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine
wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time.
The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant
thing to get right regardless of what you want to
sharpen.
Can we see your link for validation/clarification, please?
Steve
No, no one here deserves my putting in the Googles for it. I don't provide
them when no one else does or I have no good reason to; do your own
research now.
Sorry, but I'm not into angles on splitting wedges or mauls. There is none.
There is no sharp edge to be made. It seriously reduces the effectiveness
of the tool.

But you knew that, right?

Now, I think I'll go put a 7 degree edge on my hydraulic sharpener just to
make it work better.

Steve
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-05 21:24:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Now, I think I'll go put a 7 degree edge on my hydraulic sharpener just to
make it work better.
Steve
All of the old timers use 8 degrees. Took me a long time to learn that, but
what a differenced. Used to take me an hour a cord, now I can get it done
in 60 minutes.
Steve B
2011-10-05 21:34:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ed Pawlowski
Post by Steve B
Now, I think I'll go put a 7 degree edge on my hydraulic sharpener just
to make it work better.
Steve
All of the old timers use 8 degrees. Took me a long time to learn that,
but what a differenced. Used to take me an hour a cord, now I can get it
done in 60 minutes.
I find the extra degree allows me a closer shave. Or at least it used to
before the coumadin ...........

Steve
Harry K
2011-10-06 03:33:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
Post by Steve B
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store  have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic
this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not
a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses &
the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine
wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time.
The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant
thing to get right regardless of what you want to
sharpen.
Can we see your link for validation/clarification, please?
Steve
No, no one here deserves my putting in the Googles for it. I don't provide
them when no one else does or I have no good reason to; do your own
research now.
Sorry, but I'm not into angles on splitting wedges or mauls.  There is none.
There is no sharp edge to be made.  It seriously reduces the effectiveness
of the tool.
But you knew that, right?
Now, I think I'll go put a 7 degree edge on my hydraulic sharpener just to
make it work better.
Steve- Hide quoted text -
- Show quoted text -
You need to understand how a splitting tool works. Nothing happens
until it "enters" the wood and after than the point never touches the
wood, the split runs ahead of it. A dull edge just makes the work
harder.

Harry K
Harry K
2011-10-05 14:46:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store  have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And in
all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation;
just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
One of the best examples was the guy who claimed you can't sharpen a
maul because the material is too hard !!
Post by Twayne
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct
design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually
the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
File here followed by a stone if I want a _really_ sharp edge (rarely
happens)

Harry K
Twayne
2011-10-05 15:41:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Harry K
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic
this thread is! And in all the posts I did look at, not
a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation; just guesses &
the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
One of the best examples was the guy who claimed you
can't sharpen a maul because the material is too hard !!
Post by Twayne
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine
wheel pf the correct design; fills the bill every time.
The angle of the sharpening s actually the most mortant
thing to get right regardless of what you want to
sharpen.
File here followed by a stone if I want a _really_ sharp
edge (rarely happens)
Harry K
Agreed, Harry. Nothng discussed here so far really wants a scary sharp edge;
they won't last for shinola on grass or wood.
Oren
2011-10-05 22:48:56 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 5 Oct 2011 09:05:23 -0400, "Twayne"
Post by Twayne
Post by Jim Elbrecht
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 08:51:34 -0300, "don &/or Lucille"
Post by don &/or Lucille
Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off.
I don't believe a maul is intended to be sharpened. The
ones I see in the store have a dull edge, wedge shaped
head.
What a blog of useless, often even wrong or off topic this thread is! And in
all the posts I did look at, not a sngle link for valdation/clarifcation;
just guesses & the hard way to do the sharpening in about evrty case!
You spelled netkop wrong.
Post by Twayne
I simply use a bench grinder with a coarse and a fine wheel pf the correct
design; fills the bill every time. The angle of the sharpening s actually
the most mortant thing to get right regardless of what you want to sharpen.
Yawn.
harry
2011-10-04 17:45:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood but
it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it but it
only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be better
than snide remarks
Don
You will not sharpen and axe with a file it is high carbon/alloy
steel.
A.new axe should not need sharpening.

If really blunt, angle grinder & then an abrasive. eg whetstone.
Normally just the whetstone (don't let it get too blunt)

When it comes to splitting wood some o fit splits very easy, some
cannot be split at all, and everything in between.

You can buy machines to split logs.

Or maybe you were sold a pup. There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.

Or maybe you need someone to show you how to use an axe.

There are several sorts of axe BTW, some are more effective on certain
woods than other.

Some timber splits more easily when wet, others more easily when dry.
On some radial cracks appear as it drys, if you are handy with the axe
you can hit these and it splits a lot easier.
Don Phillipson
2011-10-04 19:50:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
A.new axe should not need sharpening.
This seems untrue.
1. Machines cannot make (at an economical
price) a sharp axehead. Only a (skilled) person
with a file can render an axe really sharp.
2. Retail stores do not want their stock of axes
to be sharp (to avoid accidents in handling, by
curious customers etc.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Doug Miller
2011-10-04 19:56:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by harry
A.new axe should not need sharpening.
This seems untrue.
1. Machines cannot make (at an economical
price) a sharp axehead. Only a (skilled) person
with a file can render an axe really sharp.
2. Retail stores do not want their stock of axes
to be sharp (to avoid accidents in handling, by
curious customers etc.)
Fer cryin' out loud! All he wants to do is split logs. He's not planning
to *shave* with it.
Oren
2011-10-04 19:58:53 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 15:50:31 -0400, "Don Phillipson"
Post by Don Phillipson
Post by harry
A.new axe should not need sharpening.
This seems untrue.
1. Machines cannot make (at an economical
price) a sharp axehead. Only a (skilled) person
with a file can render an axe really sharp.
2. Retail stores do not want their stock of axes
to be sharp (to avoid accidents in handling, by
curious customers etc.)
I agree with using a file. I sharpen axes, hatchets and mower blades
with a file. Mounted in the bench vise, they get pretty sharp for what
I need. I don't follow up with a wet stone, but that would not hurt
and makes the edge sharper.

The file is perfect for getting nicks out of a mower blade.
Oren
2011-10-04 20:03:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-04 21:33:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oren
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Not in the UK-- but that's the easiest way to make 2 pieces of twisted
elm separate. I've never worked with cypress, but have heard the
same of it.

Makes for difficult firewood-- but good wooden hubs for wagons or
furniture pieces that you don't want to split.

Hickory is pretty resistant- but splittable when seasoned unless
you've got a chunk of crotchwood.

Jim
Stormin Mormon
2011-10-05 11:55:49 UTC
Permalink
Years ago, I had a borrowed log splitter, 5 HP gasoline
model. I was able to split some twisted wood, that had
resisted the efforts of a hardy teen with splitting maul.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Jim Elbrecht" <***@email.com> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...

Not in the UK-- but that's the easiest way to make 2 pieces
of twisted
elm separate. I've never worked with cypress, but have
heard the
same of it.

Makes for difficult firewood-- but good wooden hubs for
wagons or
furniture pieces that you don't want to split.

Hickory is pretty resistant- but splittable when seasoned
unless
you've got a chunk of crotchwood.

Jim
harry
2011-10-05 06:37:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oren
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Elm. You have some sort of elm in America too.
It was traditionally used for the hub in wooden spoken wheels that had
lots of mortices. Also chair seats. This has been done/known for two
thousand years at least but you don't know. Tch!

You can cut a trunk into slices a couple of inches thick and it will
not split with an axe.
I once had a couple of large fallen elms, it was hell's delight
cutting them up it all directions with the chainsaw even though parts
were rotten.
They are mostly gone now with Dutch elm disease, though they were very
common here.
There is some disease now killing oak trees.

http://vindolanda.csad.ox.ac.uk/exhibition/newsteadwhl.shtml
http://www.josawmills.co.uk/products.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elm#Carpentry
Harry K
2011-10-05 14:36:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Oren
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Elm.  You have some sort of elm in America too.
It was traditionally used for the hub in wooden spoken wheels that had
lots of mortices.  Also chair seats. This has been done/known for two
thousand years at least but you don't know. Tch!
You can cut a trunk into slices a couple of inches thick and it will
not split with an axe.
 I once had a couple  of large fallen elms, it was hell's delight
cutting them up it all directions with the chainsaw even though parts
were rotten.
They are mostly gone now with Dutch elm disease, though they were very
common here.
There is some disease now killing oak trees.
http://vindolanda.csad.ox.ac.uk/exhibition/newsteadwhl.shtmlhttp://www.josawmills.co.uk/products.htmlhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elm#Carpentry
Elm! I cut some Red Elm two years ago. It was part of a deal with a
farmer to get a batch of Black Locust trees (#1 firewood). I will
never, ever fool with that stuff again. Even with a splitter I had to
use a hatchet to cut the strings.

I am now burning it. Very good wood, burns hot, burns long but the
worst wood I have ever burned for the amount of ash it leaves. It is
also a very light, feathery ash dthat I have poke down through the
stove grate. I am emptying the ashpan every 2-3 days vice the 4-5
days I was used to witht other wood.

Harry K
Jim Elbrecht
2011-10-05 15:25:19 UTC
Permalink
Harry K <***@hotmail.com> wrote:
-snip-
Post by Harry K
Elm! I cut some Red Elm two years ago. It was part of a deal with a
farmer to get a batch of Black Locust trees (#1 firewood). I will
never, ever fool with that stuff again. Even with a splitter I had to
use a hatchet to cut the strings.
With elm there seems to be a small window- about 2-3 years after it
dies - where the strings are gone, but the wood will still burn-- if
really dry.

But even at that, remember this one from the old Farmers Almanac
"Elm wood new or elm wood old, even the embers are very cold"


[I can't find that-- but here are a couple poems that cover a raft of
woods- http://thankstrees.tripod.com/id16.html ]

I might be mis-remembering this stanza;
"Oaken logs, if dry and old
Keep away the winters cold
Poplar gives a bitter smoke
Fills your eyes and makes you choke
Elmwood burns like churchyard mould
Even the very flames burn cold
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread
So it is in Ireland said
Applewood will scent the room
Pears wood smells like a flower in bloom
But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry
A King may warm his slippers by. "
Post by Harry K
I am now burning it. Very good wood, burns hot, burns long but the
worst wood I have ever burned for the amount of ash it leaves. It is
also a very light, feathery ash dthat I have poke down through the
stove grate. I am emptying the ashpan every 2-3 days vice the 4-5
days I was used to witht other wood.
That's been my experience, too. I would burn elm to get it out of
the way-- The best wood I ever burned was untreated 20' telephone
poles. Most were 30-40 year old locust or red cedar. The cedar
burned super hot and the locust lasted forever. [not to mention they
were all nice straight poles and were free-- and delivered.<g>]

Jim
Harry K
2011-10-06 03:39:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jim Elbrecht
-snip-
Elm!  I cut some Red Elm two years ago.  It was part of a deal with a
farmer to get a batch of Black Locust trees (#1 firewood).  I will
never, ever fool with that stuff again.  Even with a splitter I had to
use a hatchet to cut the strings.
With elm there seems to be a small window- about 2-3 years after it
dies - where the strings are gone, but the wood will still burn-- if
really dry.
But even at that, remember this one from the old Farmers Almanac
"Elm wood new or elm wood old, even the embers are very cold"
[I can't find that-- but here are a couple poems that cover a raft of
woods-http://thankstrees.tripod.com/id16.html]
I might be mis-remembering this stanza;
"Oaken logs, if dry and old
Keep away the winters cold
Poplar gives a bitter smoke
Fills your eyes and makes you choke
Elmwood burns like churchyard mould
Even the very flames burn cold
Hawthorn bakes the sweetest bread
So it is in Ireland said
Applewood will scent the room
Pears wood smells like a flower in bloom
But Ashwood wet and Ashwood dry
A King may warm his slippers by. "
I am now burning it.  Very good wood, burns hot, burns long but the
worst wood I have ever burned for the amount of ash it leaves.  It is
also a very light, feathery ash dthat I have poke down through the
stove grate.  I am emptying the ashpan every 2-3 days vice the 4-5
days I was used to witht other wood.
That's been my experience, too.      I would burn elm to get it out of
the way-- The best wood I ever burned was untreated 20' telephone
poles.    Most were 30-40 year old locust or red cedar.  The cedar
burned super hot and the locust lasted forever.   [not to mention they
were all nice straight poles and were free-- and delivered.<g>]
Jim
Love Black Locust. The Locust Borer is killing them off around here
and I am cutting everything I can find, currently have more than 40
cords cut/split/stacked and have about 6 more cords "in the round"
waiting to be split. Just cut my last one Monday for this season.

B Locust here is an imported species, most was planted by the settlers
back in the 1800 adn 1900s.

Harry K
Oren
2011-10-05 22:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by harry
Post by Oren
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Elm. You have some sort of elm in America too.
It was traditionally used for the hub in wooden spoken wheels that had
lots of mortices. Also chair seats. This has been done/known for two
thousand years at least but you don't know. Tch!
You can cut a trunk into slices a couple of inches thick and it will
not split with an axe.
I once had a couple of large fallen elms, it was hell's delight
cutting them up it all directions with the chainsaw even though parts
were rotten.
They are mostly gone now with Dutch elm disease, though they were very
common here.
There is some disease now killing oak trees.
http://vindolanda.csad.ox.ac.uk/exhibition/newsteadwhl.shtml
http://www.josawmills.co.uk/products.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elm#Carpentry
Your links show elm has "resistance to splitting,".

Not "cannot be split" as you stated.

Minor point though. I'm not splitting any wood. Nor do I build wagon
wheels. I bought the only one I have in Amish country of central
Pennsylvania.
Stormin Mormon
2011-10-05 11:47:10 UTC
Permalink
Please do not hold your breath and stand on one foot while
waiting.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
www.lds.org
.


"Oren" <***@127.0.0.1> wrote in message news:***@4ax.com...
On Tue, 4 Oct 2011 10:45:27 -0700 (PDT), harry
Post by harry
There are timbers in the UK cannot be
split, you have to chainsaw them in all directions.
Show me.
Steve B
2011-10-04 21:56:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Don
Investigate buying a machine driven hydraulic wood splitter. We just split
7 tons of firewood this past week, and will go this coming week and get
another three. Yes, they are a little spendy. And I know that there are
those who say that manual splitting is better, easier, and much cheaper.
All I know is that my right arm still works fine, and that's all I need to
run it. I cannot use an axe or maul or hammer due to multiple orthopedic
problems and a slight bit of laziness. New, today, a good one is $1500.
Used ones can be had for less than that, and in this economy, I'd believe I
could find a decent slightly used one for around $500.

Splitting wood is hard dangerous work no matter what you use. A member of
our family just had three amputated fingers reattached two weeks ago in a 12
hour surgery. He was splitting wood on a tractor powered splitter, and
something went wrong. I just think that a motorized splitter may be a
little safer, even in light of his accident. Teenager.

Assess your capabilities and do what you think best. Lots of people have
died splitting wood and shoveling snow. It's a sure way to find out how
good your heart is working, any means you use.

The machine is infinitely faster and easier.

Good luck.

Steve
Ed Pawlowski
2011-10-04 22:22:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steve B
Investigate buying a machine driven hydraulic wood splitter.
New, today, a good one is $1500.
Post by Steve B
Used ones can be had for less than that, and in this economy, I'd believe
I could find a decent slightly used one for around $500.
30 years ago I may have done just that. Today, I'd rather buy oil with that
money and program the thermostat.
Post by Steve B
Assess your capabilities and do what you think best. Lots of people have
died splitting wood and shoveling snow.
I'm planning to upgrade my snow blower this year too.
Steve B
2011-10-04 22:02:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Don
A few more facts, please. What do you have now? Logs? (long round pieces)
Rounds? (short round pieces) What kind of wood? How long ago was the wood
cut? Was it alive or dead when cut? Is it dried out, or wet?

Please describe as best you can the appearance ....... does it still have
bark, and can that be pulled off easily or hard to pull off? Is it dry or
wet? Is there beads of sap or pitch oozing out of the ends?

You have several things to consider here, one of them might be if the wood
is even able to be used this season. (Wood needs to "season" to dry out so
it burns better.)

Read up and get the basics. There's more to it than just cutting firewood,
as you are already finding out.

Are you ever considering harvesting your own wood? That opens up a totally
new discussion.

Steve
don &/or Lucille
2011-10-06 15:35:07 UTC
Permalink
Just to update we had a cold night and today notice a lot more checks. At
least now I can which ones are willing to be split.
Over and out!

Don
Post by don &/or Lucille
Help my first time cutting up firewod. We purchased a truckload of wood
but it seems to be awful big. Purchased a splitting axe took a file to it
but it only bounces off. Any suggesions appreciate. Helpfull ones would be
better than snide remarks
Don
Steve B
2011-10-06 16:09:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by don &/or Lucille
Just to update we had a cold night and today notice a lot more checks. At
least now I can which ones are willing to be split.
Over and out!
You can see a lot by observing.

Yogi.

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