Discussion:
Cleaning paint from eyeglasses
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Dean Hoffman
2018-08-10 00:42:23 UTC
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I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job. It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
The paint was the the inverted marking paint. It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year. Or so.
Dan Espen
2018-08-10 01:03:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dean Hoffman
I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job. It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
The paint was the the inverted marking paint. It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year. Or so.
I use denatured alcohol. It dissolves latex paint pretty quick.
--
Dan Espen
Clare Snyder
2018-08-10 01:31:36 UTC
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Post by Dan Espen
Post by Dean Hoffman
I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job. It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
The paint was the the inverted marking paint. It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year. Or so.
I use denatured alcohol. It dissolves latex paint pretty quick.
So does TSP - but it etches the glass - - - - - - -
a***@yahoo.com
2018-08-10 10:35:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Clare Snyder
Post by Dan Espen
Post by Dean Hoffman
I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job. It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
The paint was the the inverted marking paint. It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year. Or so.
I use denatured alcohol. It dissolves latex paint pretty quick.
So does TSP - but it etches the glass - - - - - - -
For latex, I smear the glasses with petroleum jelly. It softens the
latex.

Since I wear my glasses all the time except when I'm sleeping, the paint
gets cleaned off the glasses pretty quick.

Cindy Hamilton
Frank
2018-08-14 00:00:24 UTC
Permalink
      I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
   The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
Uncle Monster
2018-08-14 00:12:27 UTC
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Post by Frank
      I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
   The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
I use rubbing alcohol or Windex to clean my plastic lensed eyeglasses. Doesn't work very well on my contact lenses. ^_^

[8~{} Uncle Goggled Monster
Frank
2018-08-14 12:27:07 UTC
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Post by Uncle Monster
Post by Frank
      I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
   The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
I use rubbing alcohol or Windex to clean my plastic lensed eyeglasses. Doesn't work very well on my contact lenses. ^_^
[8~{} Uncle Goggled Monster
Windex is probably OK. I knew an acrylic cleaner that had about 15%
isopropyl alcohol.

A lab tech taught me a good method to clean glasses. First you rinse
them off to remove grit, then moisten fingers and touch to a mild hand
soap and apply gently to lenses then rinse and dry them off with a clean
tissue.

Coatings are mentioned and they can be affected and too vigorous
cleaning might remove them.
Ed Pawlowski
2018-08-14 13:57:40 UTC
Permalink
A lab tech taught me a good method to clean glasses.  First you rinse
them off to remove grit, then moisten fingers and touch to a mild hand
soap and apply gently to lenses then rinse and dry them off with a clean
tissue.
Coatings are mentioned and they can be affected and too vigorous
cleaning might remove them.
I do similar but no tissue. Hold them vertcal under a slow stream of
water and just move them across under it. Water sheds off and leaves no
residue or scratches. After over two years, my lenses look perfect.

Plain soap though, no moisturizing cream or conditioners.
Bill
2018-08-14 22:50:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Uncle Monster
Post by Frank
        I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
     The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
I use rubbing alcohol or Windex to clean my plastic lensed
eyeglasses. Doesn't work very well on my contact lenses. ^_^
[8~{} Uncle Goggled Monster
Windex is probably OK.  I knew an acrylic cleaner that had about
15% isopropyl alcohol.
A lab tech taught me a good method to clean glasses.  First you
rinse them off to remove grit, then moisten fingers and touch to
a mild hand soap and apply gently to lenses then rinse and dry
them off with a clean tissue.
I've been doing that for over 20 years. I've noticed that plastic
lenses which have been hardened on the outside hold up much
better (as in, showing no evidence of scratches at all). They
charge a little more for that feature. Of course, if I was going
to paint a house, I'd wear my previous pair of glasses.
Frank
2018-08-14 23:39:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Uncle Monster
Post by Frank
        I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
     The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
I use rubbing alcohol or Windex to clean my plastic lensed
eyeglasses. Doesn't work very well on my contact lenses. ^_^
[8~{} Uncle Goggled Monster
Windex is probably OK.  I knew an acrylic cleaner that had about 15%
isopropyl alcohol.
A lab tech taught me a good method to clean glasses.  First you rinse
them off to remove grit, then moisten fingers and touch to a mild hand
soap and apply gently to lenses then rinse and dry them off with a
clean tissue.
I've been doing that for over 20 years. I've noticed that plastic lenses
which have been hardened on the outside hold up much better (as in,
showing no evidence of scratches at all). They charge a little more for
that feature.  Of course, if I was going to paint a house, I'd wear my
previous pair of glasses.
Scratch resistance is imparted by coatings. I've seen some of the
formulations. They've been around for decades. I too keep old glasses
for messy jobs.

TimR
2018-08-14 12:16:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Frank
      I wanted to remove paint from a spare set of glasses.
Goo Gone did a pretty good job.  It took about 3 tries with
soaking time in between.
   The paint was the the inverted marking paint.  It had been
on the glasses for maybe a year.   Or so.
Most solvents are not kind to plastic lenses.
And if you have any of that antiglare coating on them, any solvent will definitely remove it.
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