Discussion:
Is there a 'magic' solution for dissolving labels on glassware?
(too old to reply)
Danny D
2013-05-09 17:32:01 UTC
Permalink
Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
glass bottles for kitchen reuse?

http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg

My current technique:
a. Soak for a day or two in water
b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
c. Repeat until the label is gone
Chemo
2013-05-09 17:43:58 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 10:32 am, Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
>  http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Just scrape off with a utility knife then clean up any glue residue
with Goo-Gone.
Percival P. Cassidy
2013-05-09 17:45:15 UTC
Permalink
On 05/09/13 01:32 pm, Danny D wrote:

> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Depends what kind of "glue." If the adhesive is gum -- the kind of
labels you lick before putting them in place, water should work. If they
are self-adhesive labels -- the kind where you peel them off a backing
sheet, Goo Gone usually works well.

Perce
Oren
2013-05-09 19:31:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 13:45:15 -0400, "Percival P. Cassidy"
<***@NotMyISP.net> wrote:

> If they
>are self-adhesive labels -- the kind where you peel them off a backing
>sheet, Goo Gone usually works well.

... if they are a vehicle tag sticker, fugittbouit

Peeled off the registration sheet, stuck for ever on the tag
Oren
2013-05-09 17:51:31 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 9 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
wrote:

>Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
>My current technique:
>a. Soak for a day or two in water
>b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>c. Repeat until the label is gone

Try peanut butter, smooth not crunchy.

Cover the label with a thin coat. Allow the paper label to absorb the
peanut oil - it will come off.
ViLco
2013-05-10 07:29:19 UTC
Permalink
Oren wrote:

> Try peanut butter, smooth not crunchy.
>
> Cover the label with a thin coat. Allow the paper label to absorb the
> peanut oil - it will come off.

What a coincidence, I use the seeds oil I have on hand which is always
peanut oil
--
"Un pasto senza vino e' come un giorno senza sole"
Anthelme Brillat Savarin
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-09 17:57:43 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Alcohol is a likely solvent. Sometimes oil will cause them to release. .
Robert
2013-05-09 17:56:56 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 12:32 pm, Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Each manufacturer seems to use a different glue. I also save
jars for refrigerator use, but I prefer the plastic one since, if
dropped, they rarely break and I am able to put them in the
freezer section for long term without worrying about them cracking
and putting glass shards in the contents....

I generally follow this procedure:

1) First, totally immerse in water for a couple hours. Lots of
labels, such as the ones on some instant coffee jars, will
then easily scrape off with a fingernail or spatula.

2) I then try rubbing alcohol. It works on some, but it just
depends on the glue.

3) I then try gasoline. This usually works on anything that
1 and 2 won't handle, but it is smelly and takes time
to air out the kitchen... Do it in the garage.. or porch..

4) If all else fails, and I am bound and determined to save
the container, I just glue a white label over the existing one
and write "Soup" or "Gravy" or something on it .....

Hint: While plastic is good for the freezer, don't use the
microwave to heat up the contents. The innards get
hot, and then it melts the plastic. Use glass for
the microwave, and remember to take the metal top
off as well as any metal ring that may be around the
rim of the jar.
Either can be use in the regular refrigerator part.
No glass in freezer, no plastic in microwave....

Just my own experience. Maybe you can find some of
it useful.
ChairMan
2013-05-09 18:16:25 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water -
> but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels
> on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

scratch the surface then apply WD 40
h***@sbcglobal.net
2013-05-10 01:03:47 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 1:16 pm, "ChairMan" <***@thanks.com> wrote:
> Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> > Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water -
> > but maybe
> > there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels
> > on
> > glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> >http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> > My current technique:
> > a. Soak for a day or two in water
> > b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> > c. Repeat until the label is gone
>
> scratch the surface then apply WD 40

Scratch the surface, and moisten with a naptha-soaked rag (in a well-
ventilated area).
EXT
2013-05-09 18:28:38 UTC
Permalink
"Danny D" <***@example.com> wrote in message
news:kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org...
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Some use hot melt to apply paper labels, water may remove the paper but I
don't know what will remove the hot melt except heat.
ChairMan
2013-05-09 21:39:44 UTC
Permalink
In news:518beb01$0$47026$c3e8da3$***@news.astraweb.com,
EXT <***@reply.in.this.group> belched:
> "Danny D" <***@example.com> wrote in message
> news:kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org...
>> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>>
>> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>>
>> My current technique:
>> a. Soak for a day or two in water
>> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>
> Some use hot melt to apply paper labels, water may remove the paper
> but I don't know what will remove the hot melt except heat.

naptha/lighter fluid will remove hot glue
zxcvbob
2013-05-09 18:30:51 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone


Soak. Put hot water in the jar to soften the glue. Scrape with a
single-edge razor blade.

Turtlewax Bug and Tar Remover is good for getting glue residue off.

Beer and wine bottle labels will usually come off cleanly after a soak
in a bucket of cold water with a little ammonia added.

Bob
Helpful person
2013-05-09 18:43:37 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 1:32 pm, Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
>  http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Vegetable oil on a paper kitchen towel will remove most sticky
residues. If this does not work completely, take most of the rest off
with a fingernail and then try the vegetable oil again. I've had to
work a few times but never had a failure.

This works on other sticky labels such as those on computers and car
windows.

http://www.richardfisher.com
Danny D
2013-05-09 19:27:38 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 11:43:37 -0700, Helpful person wrote:

> Vegetable oil on a paper kitchen towel

The oil idea did a good job on the sticky residue of
this vinegar bottle today:
http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891313/img/12891313.jpg

And, the water did well for these seasoning jar labels:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891316/img/12891316.jpg

But, the real test will be this plastic vitamin bottle label:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891321/img/12891321.jpg
Chemo
2013-05-09 19:31:55 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 12:27 pm, Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 09 May 2013 11:43:37 -0700, Helpful person wrote:
> > Vegetable oil on a paper kitchen towel
>
> The oil idea did a good job on the sticky residue of
> this vinegar bottle today:
>  http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891313/img/12891313.jpg
>
> And, the water did well for these seasoning jar labels:
>  http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891316/img/12891316.jpg
>
> But, the real test will be this plastic vitamin bottle label:
>  http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891321/img/12891321.jpg

You don't get out much do ya?
Jon Danniken
2013-05-09 19:27:14 UTC
Permalink
On 05/09/2013 10:32 AM, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

If you are using water, add a little dish detergent to the mix. This
will ad a surfactant, which reduces the surface tension of the water and
enables it to penetrate significantly faster.

Jon
Danny D
2013-05-09 19:33:49 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 12:27:14 -0700, Jon Danniken wrote:

> If you are using water, add a little dish detergent to the mix.

That's a great idea. The alcohol could be a wetting agent
with the dish-detergent surfactant adding to the effect!

The true test will be on the plastic vitamin jar!
Danny D
2013-05-09 19:53:49 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:

EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS:

I am soaking the tough jobs in the suggested solutions,
as we speak ... (Note: the gasoline & WD40 are omitted
due to the fact that we want to re-use the jars!).

Here are the three experiments + one control:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891481/img/12891481.jpg

I poured alcohol on the top left; dish detergent at top right;
and olive oil in the foreground; with water in the circular
tub to the right as the experimental control.

Then I filled each container with water and let sit:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891546/img/12891546.jpg

Note that everything I've tried in the past has failed
on these plastic vitamin and peanut butter jars; so it
will be interesting to see what happens in a day or two.
zxcvbob
2013-05-09 20:24:46 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:
> On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:
>
> EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS:
>
> I am soaking the tough jobs in the suggested solutions,
> as we speak ... (Note: the gasoline & WD40 are omitted
> due to the fact that we want to re-use the jars!).
>
> Here are the three experiments + one control:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891481/img/12891481.jpg
>
> I poured alcohol on the top left; dish detergent at top right;
> and olive oil in the foreground; with water in the circular
> tub to the right as the experimental control.
>
> Then I filled each container with water and let sit:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891546/img/12891546.jpg
>
> Note that everything I've tried in the past has failed
> on these plastic vitamin and peanut butter jars; so it
> will be interesting to see what happens in a day or two.
>


Peanut butter jars? Why didn't you say so! (those are my favorite jars
for reuse -- I store bullets in them for reloading) I thought you were
talking about glass jars.

Fill the jar with hot water, let it sit for a minute so the heat can
loosen the glue, then carefully peel off the label. Most of the glue
will come off with the label. You can then use "Bug and Tar Remover" or
"Goo Gone" to clean off the residue. Orange-based cleaner or turpentine
would probably work too.

--
HTH, Bob
S Viemeister
2013-05-09 20:39:52 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 4:24 PM, zxcvbob wrote:

> Fill the jar with hot water, let it sit for a minute so the heat can
> loosen the glue, then carefully peel off the label. Most of the glue
> will come off with the label. You can then use "Bug and Tar Remover" or
> "Goo Gone" to clean off the residue. Orange-based cleaner or turpentine
> would probably work too.
>
+1
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-09 20:47:30 UTC
Permalink
zxcvbob <***@charter.net> wrote:
> Danny D wrote:
>> On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:
>>
>> EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS:
>>
>> I am soaking the tough jobs in the suggested solutions,
>> as we speak ... (Note: the gasoline & WD40 are omitted
>> due to the fact that we want to re-use the jars!).
>>
>> Here are the three experiments + one control:
>> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891481/img/12891481.jpg
>>
>> I poured alcohol on the top left; dish detergent at top right;
>> and olive oil in the foreground; with water in the circular
>> tub to the right as the experimental control.
>>
>> Then I filled each container with water and let sit:
>> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891546/img/12891546.jpg
>>
>> Note that everything I've tried in the past has failed
>> on these plastic vitamin and peanut butter jars; so it
>> will be interesting to see what happens in a day or two.
>>
>
>
> Peanut butter jars? Why didn't you say so! (those are my favorite
> jars for reuse -- I store bullets in them for reloading) I thought
> you were talking about glass jars.
>
> Fill the jar with hot water, let it sit for a minute so the heat can
> loosen the glue, then carefully peel off the label. Most of the glue
> will come off with the label. You can then use "Bug and Tar Remover"
> or "Goo Gone" to clean off the residue. Orange-based cleaner or
> turpentine would probably work too.

Sometimes you don't even have to do the water thing. What looks like a
daunting label, for instance on Nature Made Vitamins, will actually peel off
as you described, almost completely if not perfectly. All you need is to get
a grip on one good clean edge of the label.

Goo Gone is a lot more expensive than the household chemicals mentioned, but
I like the product, especially the Painter's Pal, which it truly is. If that
fails, then my little tin can of Goof Off is my last resort.

MartyB
Oren
2013-05-09 21:08:30 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 15:24:46 -0500, zxcvbob <***@charter.net>
wrote:

> turpentine
>would probably work too.

+ 1
The Daring Dufas
2013-05-10 00:35:51 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 3:24 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
> Danny D wrote:
>> On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:
>>
>> EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS:
>>
>> I am soaking the tough jobs in the suggested solutions, as we speak
>> ... (Note: the gasoline & WD40 are omitted
>> due to the fact that we want to re-use the jars!).
>>
>> Here are the three experiments + one control:
>> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891481/img/12891481.jpg
>>
>> I poured alcohol on the top left; dish detergent at top right;
>> and olive oil in the foreground; with water in the circular
>> tub to the right as the experimental control.
>>
>> Then I filled each container with water and let sit:
>> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891546/img/12891546.jpg
>>
>> Note that everything I've tried in the past has failed
>> on these plastic vitamin and peanut butter jars; so it
>> will be interesting to see what happens in a day or two.
>>
>
>
> Peanut butter jars? Why didn't you say so! (those are my favorite jars
> for reuse -- I store bullets in them for reloading) I thought you were
> talking about glass jars.
>

I believe the OP is writing about glass jars but I like the plastic
unbreakable peanut butter jars for hardware because they can get dropped
and tossed around the van without glass and parts flying. ^_^

TDD
Danny D
2013-05-10 01:23:25 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 19:35:51 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

> I believe the OP is writing about glass jars but I like the plastic
> unbreakable peanut butter jars for hardware because they can get dropped
> and tossed around the van without glass and parts flying. ^_^

Actually, my mistake for changing jars in the middle of the thread!
http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12893328/img/12893328.jpg

I started with glass, but they were so easy to remove the labels
I then moved on to the muuuuch-harder-to-remove plastics vitamin
jars with paper glued on labels.

The plastic vitamin jars have been soaking in the recommended
solutions for the past five or six hours or so:
1. Oil (doesn't look good so far)
2. Soap (looks pretty good)
3. Alcohol (seems the same as the control)
4. Water (the control)

Also I have a peanut-butter jar soaking in water, but, it
appears to have a plastic label, and not paper like
the vitamin jars - so - it's an anomaly.

I'll report back tomorrow ...
Polly Esther
2013-05-10 03:23:36 UTC
Permalink
"zxcvbob" <> Peanut butter jars? Why didn't you say so! (those are my
favorite jars
> for reuse -- I store bullets in them for reloading) I thought you were
> talking about glass jars.
>
> Fill the jar with hot water, let it sit for a minute so the heat can
> loosen the glue, then carefully peel off the label. Most of the glue will
> come off with the label. You can then use "Bug and Tar Remover" or "Goo
> Gone" to clean off the residue. Orange-based cleaner or turpentine would
> probably work too.
Storing bullets? I had no idea. I'll give one to Mr. Esther. Peanut
butter jars are also fun for a toddler just learning how to open things. A
ping-pong ball ( or a frog) inside a peanut butter jar makes learning to
twist a lid big fun.
The Real Bev
2013-05-10 07:12:52 UTC
Permalink
On 05/09/2013 08:23 PM, Polly Esther wrote:

> Storing bullets? I had no idea. I'll give one to Mr. Esther. Peanut
> butter jars are also fun for a toddler just learning how to open things. A
> ping-pong ball ( or a frog) inside a peanut butter jar makes learning to
> twist a lid big fun.

As an aside, octopi have learned to open screw-top jars.

--
Cheers, Bev
----------------------------------------------
"Luge strategy? Lie flat and try not to die."
-- Carmen Boyle
Olympic Luge Gold Medal winner - 1996
Robert
2013-05-10 10:28:39 UTC
Permalink
On May 10, 2:12 am, The Real Bev <***@gmail.com> wrote:

>
> As an aside, octopi have learned to open screw-top jars.
>
> --
> Cheers, Bev


Yes, but the ping pong balls float to the
top of the ocean, and they become sad.....
TimR
2013-05-10 12:39:10 UTC
Permalink
Most of the time, soap and water is plenty.

When that doesn't work, I go to Goo-Gone.

When that fails, carb cleaner has always worked.
Danny D
2013-05-10 19:22:09 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 05:39:10 -0700, TimR wrote:

> When that fails, carb cleaner has always worked

When they dry out, that's what I'll try ...
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg
Attila Iskander
2013-05-17 12:49:42 UTC
Permalink
"TimR" <***@aol.com> wrote in message
news:9dba84cc-f667-4e25-9ed6-***@googlegroups.com...
> Most of the time, soap and water is plenty.
>
> When that doesn't work, I go to Goo-Gone.
>
> When that fails, carb cleaner has always worked.


Vegetable Oil
After you have soaked off the paper part, use vegetable oil and work it
into the glue with a brush or scrub pad that won't scratch the glass
Sky
2013-05-09 20:24:39 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>

Try lighter fluid, then wash with soapy water. Another 'fix' would be
to add and dissolve "dishwasher" soap (the dry, crystal sort) to a bowl
of water and soak the glass container with the label in that solution
for a few hours, then the label peels off easily and quickly. However,
the lighter fluid may be needed to remove the gluey residue.

Sky

--

Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!
George M. Middius
2013-05-09 20:32:25 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:

> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water -

You want GooGone. Supermarkets, home centers, maybe even chain drugstores.
Brooklyn1
2013-05-09 21:03:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 9 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
wrote:

>Just curious

Paper labels on glass generally disappear in a dishwasher, if not a
safety razor always works.
Oren
2013-05-09 21:33:46 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:03:23 -0400, Brooklyn1
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Thu, 9 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
>wrote:
>
>>Just curious
>
>Paper labels on glass generally disappear in a dishwasher, if not a
>safety razor always works.

Glass bottles can be brought to a boil & simmer in a pot on the stove.

"Stuff" comes off.
Janet Wilder
2013-05-09 21:57:35 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>

Use a hair dryer to blow hot air onto the label. This will loosen the
glue so you can peel it off. If there is any glue residue, use Goo Gone.

Long time ago my first husband worked for a discount shoe store chain
that put labels on the sole of the shoes. They had those 'x' cuts and
were almost impossible to remove. Someone told him about the hair dryer
method and I've used it successfully ever since.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
Nancy Young
2013-05-09 22:05:05 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 5:57 PM, Janet Wilder wrote:

> Long time ago my first husband worked for a discount shoe store chain
> that put labels on the sole of the shoes. They had those 'x' cuts and
> were almost impossible to remove. Someone told him about the hair dryer
> method and I've used it successfully ever since.

Like some DIY show I watched where the guy was struggling to get up
a linoleum floor. I thought he needed a heat gun but his friend
suggested a hair dryer. That actually worked.

Long ago my ex gave his brother some pots, they had a label on each
one that wouldn't budge. While he was heating something up on the
stove, I picked at the label and it came off effortlessly. It was
good for a laugh at the time, but I learned that heat was a good
tool to release glue.

nancy
Oren
2013-05-09 22:45:57 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 16:57:35 -0500, Janet Wilder
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Janet Wilder
>Way-the-heck-south Texas
>Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

I LUV you <wink>

Vittles are good.
Julie Bove
2013-05-09 22:36:57 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Goo Gone.
Danny D
2013-05-10 00:11:14 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 15:36:57 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

> Goo Gone.

So many people recommended this stuff, I had to look
it up, via the MSDS:
http://googone.com/GooGone-MSDS

It appears to be roughly 95% petroleum distillates,
and then from 1 to 10% Tripropylene glycol methyl ether.

Googling for what "petroleum distillates" are, Wikipedia
wasn't all that helpful:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_distillate

Googling some more, it looks like it's the same as
mineral spirits:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit

So, I should be able to buy some at the hardware store.
George M. Middius
2013-05-10 17:20:38 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:

> > Goo Gone.

> Googling some more, it looks like it's the same as
> mineral spirits:

It's a combination of solvents, plus it's heavily scented. If you don't need a
100% removal rate and you don't care about the nasty smell, then buy mineral
spirits and save yourself 45 cents.
Oren
2013-05-10 17:48:42 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 13:20:38 -0400, George M. Middius
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

>Danny D wrote:
>
>> > Goo Gone.
>
>> Googling some more, it looks like it's the same as
>> mineral spirits:
>
>It's a combination of solvents, plus it's heavily scented. If you don't need a
>100% removal rate and you don't care about the nasty smell, then buy mineral
>spirits and save yourself 45 cents.
>

BSR kit

<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=201pgTaEseQ>
Danny D
2013-05-10 19:21:38 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 10:48:42 -0700, Oren wrote:

> BSR kit

BS removal kit ... even works on a Prius!

:)
k***@attt.bizz
2013-05-10 23:33:39 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 19:21:38 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
wrote:

>On Fri, 10 May 2013 10:48:42 -0700, Oren wrote:
>
>> BSR kit
>
>BS removal kit ... even works on a Prius!
>
>:)

Is that what the driver's door is called?
Danny D
2013-05-10 19:19:26 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 13:20:38 -0400, George M. Middius wrote:

> It's a combination of solvents, plus it's heavily scented. If you don't
> need a 100% removal rate and you don't care about the nasty smell, then
> buy mineral spirits and save yourself 45 cents.

Thanks for the advice.

I'm a firm believer in figuring out what a chemical is, and then
just buying it in bulk.

For example, my female kids love that straight acetone from
my garage works just fine when they run out of nail polish
remover.

And, on of my male kids uses dish detergent instead of shampoo
for his short hair, since he learned that they're practically
the same thing (and all my kids have to buy their own personal
hygiene products since they fight over them all the time).

I'm going to try the following solvents, simply because they
were what are in my garage at the moment:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg
dsi1
2013-05-10 19:37:00 UTC
Permalink
On 5/10/2013 9:19 AM, Danny D wrote:
>
> Thanks for the advice.
>
> I'm a firm believer in figuring out what a chemical is, and then
> just buying it in bulk.
>
> For example, my female kids love that straight acetone from
> my garage works just fine when they run out of nail polish
> remover.
>
> And, on of my male kids uses dish detergent instead of shampoo
> for his short hair, since he learned that they're practically
> the same thing (and all my kids have to buy their own personal
> hygiene products since they fight over them all the time).
>
> I'm going to try the following solvents, simply because they
> were what are in my garage at the moment:
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg
>

Acetone would probably work on glass and ceramic - not plastic. I'd use
MEK because it's more aggressive than acetone and it's what I have on
hand. You have to be careful with the stuff cause it can be absorbed
through the skin. I only use a little at a time.

I've used dish detergent to wash my hair. It worked great but it would
give me tremendous dandruff when I used it 15 years ago. I've used it
recently and it worked fine without the dandruff problem. These days,
however, I just use a bar of soap.
The Daring Dufas
2013-05-10 00:38:13 UTC
Permalink
On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>

I'm surprised nobody mentioned WD-40. ^_^

TDD
Tekkie®
2013-05-16 02:03:23 UTC
Permalink
The Daring Dufas posted for all of us...

And I know how to SNIP

>
> On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:
> > Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> > there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> > glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
> >
> > http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
> >
> > My current technique:
> > a. Soak for a day or two in water
> > b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> > c. Repeat until the label is gone
> >
>
> I'm surprised nobody mentioned WD-40. ^_^
>
> TDD

Ya just HAD to do it! Geez...

--
Tekkie
Nancy2
2013-05-10 00:38:36 UTC
Permalink
On May 9, 2:53 pm, Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:
>
> EXPERIMENT IN PROGRESS:
>
> I am soaking the tough jobs in the suggested solutions,
> as we speak ... (Note: the gasoline & WD40 are omitted
> due to the fact that we want to re-use the jars!).
>
> Here are the three experiments + one control:
>  http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891481/img/12891481.jpg
>
> I poured alcohol on the top left; dish detergent at top right;
> and olive oil in the foreground; with water in the circular
> tub to the right as the experimental control.
>
> Then I filled each container with water and let sit:
>  http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12891546/img/12891546.jpg
>
> Note that everything I've tried in the past has failed
> on these plastic vitamin and peanut butter jars; so it
> will be interesting to see what happens in a day or two.

You could do what smart people do ... Go to your local hardware store
and get some of that stuff they sell to remove sticky label residue.
But I suppose that is too logical.

N.
nestork
2013-05-10 04:36:01 UTC
Permalink
Let me save you some time:

Mineral Spirits (also called "paint thinner", "solvent" and "Varsol"
will dissolve the glue holding MOST labels on jars. What I do is simpl
scrape the impermeable surface paper off, and then apply mineral spirit
with an eye dropper to the porous paper beneath, put the jar with th
wet label in a plastic bag wrapped tightly around the jar (so th
mineral spirits doesn't evaporate) and allow the mineral spirits t
penetrate through the porous paper and dissolve the glue holding th
paper on to the glass. After 5 or 10 minutes, remove the jar and pee
the paper off with a razor blade or sharp knife. The paper will com
off easily, but you just need something sharp to get under it and lif
it off the glass.

On some jars, mineral spirits is very slow to work, and I expect that'
because they use a different glue because of the temperature of th
stuff originally put in the jars. Jam is jarred when it's hot becaus
it's too viscous to pump when it's cold, and so jam will usually be pu
in glass jars that can stand the heat better.

In those cases, I use lacquer thinner or acetone. Lacquer thinner i
mostly toluene (it's typically 70 to 80 % toluene), so if you fin
toluene for sale anywhere, you can use that instead of lacquer thinner.
Every paint store will sell lacquer thinner.

Acetone is the chemical found most commonly in women's nail polis
remover. Acetone is very fast to evaporate, so a similar solvent calle
"amyl acetate" will often be added to the nail polish remover becaus
amyl acetate evaporates more slowly. Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) i
acetone's closest chemical cousin, and it evaporates a little mor
slowly than acetone, so if acetine works, then MEK should not only work
but work better because of it's slower evaporation rate.

The advantage in using mineral spirits, lacquer thinner and acetone/ME
over dish detergent and cooking oil is that every one of the former wil
all evaporate completely without leaving any residue, whereas the latte
won't evaporate at all. That is, even if cooking oil dissolves the glu
holding the label on, you then still need to use something else t
remove the cooking oil. The benefit of dish washing detergent is tha
it can be washed off with water, albeit plenty of water to remove all o
it.

So, if it wuz me, I would save a step and just use a solvent tha
evaporates completely, thereby preventing your having to use somethin
else to remove your label remover


--
nestork
Paul M. Cook
2013-05-10 00:52:03 UTC
Permalink
Goof Off is a product that works great.

I also just wash in the dishwasher. It loosens them up and they usually
fall off on their own.


"Danny D" <***@example.com> wrote in message
news:kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org...
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone
Broadback
2013-05-10 07:09:28 UTC
Permalink
On 10/05/2013 01:52, Paul M. Cook wrote:
> Goof Off is a product that works great.
>
> I also just wash in the dishwasher. It loosens them up and they usually
> fall off on their own.
>
>
> "Danny D" <***@example.com> wrote in message
> news:kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org...
>> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>>
>> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>>
>> My current technique:
>> a. Soak for a day or two in water
>> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>
>
The problem with that is there is a tendency for the paper to clog the
dish washer. Try placing the item in the freezer for a while, lots of
labels then peel of whole and with ease.
G. Morgan
2013-05-10 09:35:38 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:

>Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
>My current technique:
>a. Soak for a day or two in water
>b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>c. Repeat until the label is gone

"Goo Gone", or charcoal fluid - lighter fluid.

--

I met a guy today who said he was addicted to brake fluid!
But he says he can stop anytime.
Melba's Jammin'
2013-05-10 15:33:03 UTC
Permalink
In article <kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org>,
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:

> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

I've heard of using peanut butter. I use Goof-Off.
--
Barb,
http://www.barbschaller.com, as of April 8, 2013.
Brooklyn1
2013-05-10 15:45:56 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 10:33:03 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
<***@earthlink.net> wrote:

>In article <kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org>,
> Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
>
>> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>>
>> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>>
>> My current technique:
>> a. Soak for a day or two in water
>> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>
>I've heard of using peanut butter. I use Goof-Off.

I've not had any problem removing labels from glass, I use a safety
razor to scrape off lables same as the stickers from windshields....
it's plastics and other soft items that makes removing labels more
difficult... I especially find those stickers on produce difficult.
Nate Nagel
2013-05-10 16:54:55 UTC
Permalink
On 05/10/2013 11:33 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
> In article <kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org>,
> Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
>
>> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>>
>> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>>
>> My current technique:
>> a. Soak for a day or two in water
>> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>
> I've heard of using peanut butter. I use Goof-Off.
>

If warm water doesn't take them off, a little vegetable oil may dissolve
the residue.

nate

--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
Danny D
2013-05-10 19:16:22 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 12:54:55 -0400, Nate Nagel wrote:

> If warm water doesn't take them off, a little vegetable oil
> may dissolve the residue.

The odd thing is that the olive oil fared no better
than did water or alcohol, in my preliminary tests
over the past 24 hours:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898642/img/12898642.jpg

The diluted alcohol fared about the same as the oil:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898662/640/12898662.jpg

And the water was about the same as oil & alcohol were:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898676/img/12898676.jpg

Only the dish detergent seemed measurably better:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898686/img/12898686.jpg

While all four methods easily remove the paper label,
all four appear to need additional suggested solvents or
petroleum distallates in order to remove the gummy residue
coating the entire area under the paper label.
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg
Roy
2013-05-10 16:15:11 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, May 9, 2013 11:32:01 AM UTC-6, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
>
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
>
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
>
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
>
>
> My current technique:
>
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
>
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
>
> c. Repeat until the label is gone

Why not use your favorite solvent?...MURIATIC ACID.
Danny D
2013-05-10 19:04:27 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 10 May 2013 09:15:11 -0700, Roy wrote:

> Why not use your favorite solvent?...MURIATIC ACID.

Funny you should mention pool acid ...
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898627/img/12898627.jpg
Danny D
2013-05-11 03:49:39 UTC
Permalink
>> Why not use your favorite solvent?...MURIATIC ACID.
> Funny you should mention pool acid ...
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898627/img/12898627.jpg

Just to report back on the hydrochloric acid, it didn't dissolve
the paper label any better than did the dish detergent solution.
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900797/img/12900797.jpg

But I really like how well the gasoline almost instantly removes
the gummy glue residue off the plastic bottles:
http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900798/img/12900798.jpg

The results are clear plastic bottles with no labels or glue:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900799/img/12900799.jpg
Danny D
2013-05-10 22:01:23 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:

UPDATE:

Nothing really worked better than dish detergent and water
for getting the *paper* part of the labels off the plastic
Costco vitamin jars... but the gummy glue residue was left:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899721/img/12899721.jpg

MAF cleaner dried too quickly, leaving a sticky residue:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899731/img/12899731.jpg

Brake cleaner had similar results to the MAF cleaner:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899695/img/12899695.jpg

My wife noticed the smell with the engine degreaser:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899744/img/12899744.jpg

The alcohol was ineffective at reducing the gummy glue:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899750/img/12899750.jpg

The paint thinner turned the glue into a milky residue:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899756/img/12899756.jpg

Likewise with the better-smelling WD-40:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899764/img/12899764.jpg

Acetone simply made the plastic itself sticky:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899769/img/12899769.jpg

And TSP didn't do much more than the dish detergent did:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899780/img/12899780.jpg

Within margins of error, I'd have to tentatively conclude that
the winner would be whatever smells best to you of these 3:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899794/img/12899794.jpg

For example, here's a before-and-after glue-removal comparison:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899805/img/12899805.jpg
Danny D
2013-05-10 22:29:49 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 09 May 2013 17:32:01 +0000, Danny D wrote:

> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe there
> is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on glass and
> plastic bottles for kitchen reuse?

LESSONS LEARNED:

In summary, the lesson learned is that the paper labels easily
fell off the glass bottles after an overnight soak in water and
dish detergent.

However, on the plastic vitamin bottles, the paper labels came
off only with an overnight soak, where the mix of dish detergent
was necessary, and, even so, required a bit of fingernail scrubbing.
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899721/img/12899721.jpg

The real problem was the pervasive gummy glue, which, only the
lower volatility petroleum distillates did a good job on (because
the higher-volatility petroleum distillates evaporated too soon).
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899890/img/12899890.jpg

BTW, the green one at the right was discolored by the acetone;
so of all the fluids chosen, acetone is the most deprecated.
Michael OConnor
2013-05-11 00:46:04 UTC
Permalink
Try Goo Gone; it is made to take sticky labels off things. Squirt
some on, wait five minutes, and it should rub off with a paper towel.
Pythagoras
2013-05-11 03:06:21 UTC
Permalink
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Danny D
2013-05-11 03:54:52 UTC
Permalink
ROUND 2:

My new favorite method of removing the labels and glue from
Costco gummy vitamin plastic jars is this process:

a) Soak in a soapy solution of dish detergent (24 hours)
b) Scrape off the paper label with my fingernails
c) Douse in gasoline for a minute or two
d) Wash in laundry detergent or tri-sodium phosphate

Since the gasoline necessitates being outside, here'
my starting point today:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900811/img/12900811.jpg

Here's what will be soaking overnight:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900812/img/12900812.jpg
atec77
2013-05-11 07:40:22 UTC
Permalink
On 11/05/2013 1:54 PM, Danny D wrote:
> ROUND 2:
>
> My new favorite method of removing the labels and glue from
> Costco gummy vitamin plastic jars is this process:
>
> a) Soak in a soapy solution of dish detergent (24 hours)
> b) Scrape off the paper label with my fingernails
> c) Douse in gasoline for a minute or two
> d) Wash in laundry detergent or tri-sodium phosphate
>
> Since the gasoline necessitates being outside, here'
> my starting point today:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900811/img/12900811.jpg
>
> Here's what will be soaking overnight:
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12900812/img/12900812.jpg
>
>
>
Just wet the label with Eucalyptus oil

--









X-No-Archive: Yes
PeterD
2013-05-12 04:58:58 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote in news:kmgmih$j9n$***@speranza.aioe.org:

> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?
>
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12890207/img/12890207.jpeg
>
> My current technique:
> a. Soak for a day or two in water
> b. Scrape with a kitchen fork
> c. Repeat until the label is gone
>

Cooking oil will help. Don't actually cook the glass,tho.
Danny D
2013-05-12 16:44:24 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 04:58:58 +0000, PeterD wrote:

> Cooking oil will help. Don't actually cook the glass,tho.

Personally, I gave up on the oil idea as I didn't find the
vegetable oil anywhere nearly as effective as the petroleum
distillates (gasoline was the best) in instantly dissolving
the gummy deposits on the plastic gummy vitamin jars.

Here's my latest experiment, concluded this morning:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12914926/img/12914926.jpg

These are my steps for those plastic vitamin bottle labels:
1. Soak 24 hours in soapy water
2. Scrape paper labels off
3. Rinse in gasoline solvent
4. Dip in the soapy water
5. Rinse with garden hose
6. Air dry in the sun
Oren
2013-05-12 20:20:16 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 16:44:24 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
wrote:

> I gave up on the oil idea as I didn't find the
>vegetable oil anywhere nearly as effective as the petroleum
>distillates (gasoline was the best) in instantly dissolving
>the gummy deposits on the plastic gummy vitamin jars.

Rub the area with Vaseline, another petroleum product.
Danny D
2013-05-13 13:21:57 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 13:20:16 -0700, Oren wrote:

> Rub the area with Vaseline, another petroleum product.

I think I'm finally out of gummi vitamin bottles!

But the kids are almost finished with the next one ...

So it will get the Vaseline treatment to see how well that fares
in comparison to the gasoline.
Danny D
2013-05-15 05:45:28 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 13:20:16 -0700, Oren wrote:

> Rub the area with Vaseline, another petroleum product.

Yeah, but I have so much extra gasoline lying around than vaseline!
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12925619/img/12925619.jpg
The Real Bev
2013-05-15 19:57:04 UTC
Permalink
On 05/14/2013 10:45 PM, Danny D wrote:

> On Sun, 12 May 2013 13:20:16 -0700, Oren wrote:
>
>> Rub the area with Vaseline, another petroleum product.
>
> Yeah, but I have so much extra gasoline lying around than vaseline!
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12925619/img/12925619.jpg

I was at the 99-Cents-Only Store this morning and picked up a 2-ounce
bottle of Goo Gone. Amazingly enough, it worked really well on one of
the Costco plastic candy/nut/whatever containers. Spread a little bit
over the sticky with your fingers, look for a knife to use to scrape it
off, find out that it doesn't scrape, grab paper towel, wipe vigorously
and VOILA! Washed it with liquid detergent. Bravo. I didn't expect it
to work (Shoe Goo is worthless), but it really did.

I also bought one of those Topsy Turvy things for growing tomatoes
upside down ("As seen on TV"). I think they were $10 or so originally.
I have some MiracleGro dirt and some 4" cherry tomato plants so I'll
give it a try. Again, not much hope -- why would they be available at
the 99-Cent Store if they worked?

OTOH, there's the Goo Gone...

--
Cheers, Bev
=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
SAVE GAS, FART IN A JAR
Me
2013-05-12 20:29:07 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote in news:kmogt8$7e8$***@speranza.aioe.org:

> On Sun, 12 May 2013 04:58:58 +0000, PeterD wrote:
>
>> Cooking oil will help. Don't actually cook the glass,tho.
>
> Personally, I gave up on the oil idea as I didn't find the
> vegetable oil anywhere nearly as effective as the petroleum
> distillates (gasoline was the best) in instantly dissolving
> the gummy deposits on the plastic gummy vitamin jars.
>
> Here's my latest experiment, concluded this morning:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12914926/img/12914926.jpg
>
> These are my steps for those plastic vitamin bottle labels:
> 1. Soak 24 hours in soapy water
> 2. Scrape paper labels off
> 3. Rinse in gasoline solvent
> 4. Dip in the soapy water
> 5. Rinse with garden hose
> 6. Air dry in the sun
>
>

Chemicals ! vapors galore. Better wash the glassware a lot to remove the
stench.
Danny D
2013-05-13 02:02:48 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 20:29:07 +0000, Me wrote:

> Chemicals ! vapors galore.
> Better wash the glassware a lot to remove the stench.

True. But outside, I don't smell anything.
Plus, I rinsed them off pretty well.

http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12918692/img/12918692.jpg
John Weiss
2013-05-12 21:42:24 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:

>> Cooking oil will help. Don't actually cook the glass,tho.
>
> Personally, I gave up on the oil idea as I didn't find the
> vegetable oil anywhere nearly as effective as the petroleum
> distillates (gasoline was the best) in instantly dissolving
> the gummy deposits on the plastic gummy vitamin jars.

Try Goo Gone or Goof Off or similar product made especially for
dissolving gummy things.
Danny D
2013-05-13 02:05:32 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 12 May 2013 21:42:24 +0000, John Weiss wrote:

> Try Goo Gone or Goof Off or similar product made especially
> for dissolving gummy things.

We looked up the main ingredient in the Goo dissolvers; they
appear to be 95% petroleum distillates.

We tested a few petroleum distillates, such as carb cleaner,
MAF cleaner, paint thinner, engine degreaser, etc., but what
worked fastest and easiest was plain old California gasoline.

In fact, I tried a new technique today, which was to put the
plastic jars inside a mixed-nuts container from Costco, and
shook it for about 10 seconds; then washed it off.
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12918691/img/12918691.jpg

Worked like a charm!
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-13 14:54:10 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> On Sun, 12 May 2013 21:42:24 +0000, John Weiss wrote:
>
>> Try Goo Gone or Goof Off or similar product made especially
>> for dissolving gummy things.
>
> We looked up the main ingredient in the Goo dissolvers; they
> appear to be 95% petroleum distillates.
>
> We tested a few petroleum distillates, such as carb cleaner,
> MAF cleaner, paint thinner, engine degreaser, etc., but what
> worked fastest and easiest was plain old California gasoline.
>
> In fact, I tried a new technique today, which was to put the
> plastic jars inside a mixed-nuts container from Costco, and
> shook it for about 10 seconds; then washed it off.
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12918691/img/12918691.jpg
>
> Worked like a charm!

Sounds great if you're going to store fasteners and such. But once you've
washed it with gasoline, it's no longer a food grade container.

Just sayin'.

MartyB
Danny D.
2013-05-13 15:34:49 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 May 2013 09:54:10 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

> once you've washed it with gasoline, it's no longer a
> food grade container.

Maybe. Maybe not. It would be nice if a chemist is in
the group as I can see reasons why and why not myself.

For example, most often recommended goo-be-gone stuff
is simply 95% petroleum distillates themselves:
http://googone.com/GooGone-MSDS

So, I'm not positive that one petroleum distillate is that
much worse than another (although I am not a chemist).

Firstly, the labels are on the OUTSIDE of the plastic container
and the caps were on the entire time; so one could argue that
the insides are wholly uncontaminated.

Secondly, I did wash with a surfactant after dissolving the
label glue with the petroleum distillate, so, one could argue
it's as clean as you get your oily pots and pans.

Lastly, my petroleum distillate was relatively volatile, so,
while trace amounts might incorporate themselves into the
plastic, most simply vaporized outside in the hot sun.

Given that, I'm not convinced it's not food grade; however
someone with more chemistry background and experience would
know more than I do about this.
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-13 17:41:56 UTC
Permalink
Danny D. <***@is.invalid> wrote:
> On Mon, 13 May 2013 09:54:10 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
>
>> once you've washed it with gasoline, it's no longer a
>> food grade container.
>
> Maybe. Maybe not. It would be nice if a chemist is in
> the group as I can see reasons why and why not myself.
>
> For example, most often recommended goo-be-gone stuff
> is simply 95% petroleum distillates themselves:
> http://googone.com/GooGone-MSDS
>
> So, I'm not positive that one petroleum distillate is that
> much worse than another (although I am not a chemist).
>
> Firstly, the labels are on the OUTSIDE of the plastic container
> and the caps were on the entire time; so one could argue that
> the insides are wholly uncontaminated.
>
> Secondly, I did wash with a surfactant after dissolving the
> label glue with the petroleum distillate, so, one could argue
> it's as clean as you get your oily pots and pans.
>
> Lastly, my petroleum distillate was relatively volatile, so,
> while trace amounts might incorporate themselves into the
> plastic, most simply vaporized outside in the hot sun.
>
> Given that, I'm not convinced it's not food grade; however
> someone with more chemistry background and experience would
> know more than I do about this.

I'm no chemist but I wonder if you can find any food safety authority
(meaning academically accredited or legally authoritative) which condones
putting food in plastic containers which were cleaned in a non-industrial
setting with gasoline. If you don't find your (food science) chemist here,
go out and try to validate what you want to believe because there is
abundant scientifically based food safety information out there on federal,
state, local, and university research websites. I've burnt out on
researching authoritative food safety resources whenever someone posts
something like this, but it's easy to find.

On another note, taste and smell sensitivity among people varies widely, but
in my case, I doubt you can soak a plastic peanut butter container in
gasoline and then clean it so perfectly that I can't detect it. The point
being that just because you can't detect it doesn't mean others can't, and
if you've recently handled gas you may not be able to detect a trace amount.
I don't know how much you separated yourself in time and space from the gas
soaking experiment, but it's food for thought.

MartyB
Danny D
2013-05-13 19:46:37 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 May 2013 12:41:56 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

> I doubt you can soak a plastic peanut butter container in
> gasoline and then clean it so perfectly that I can't detect it.

This may be very true as my wife can smell the essence of
what I've been doing even days afterward!
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg

In fact, she had arrived home *after* my experiment had concluded:
http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12893328/img/12893328.jpg

But, she still knew *something* was up by the odd essence of
distillate she caught, even though all the windows were open.

She inquired as to whether I was "up to something" again in
"her" kitchen! Little did she know that prior, her sink had:

MAF cleaner:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899731/img/12899731.jpg

Brake cleaner:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899695/img/12899695.jpg

Engine degreaser: <=== this, I think, is what she smelled!
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899744/img/12899744.jpg

Paint thinner:
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899756/img/12899756.jpg

WD-40:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899764/img/12899764.jpg

Acetone:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899769/img/12899769.jpg

TSP:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899780/img/12899780.jpg

Isopropyl alcohol:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899750/img/12899750.jpg

Good thing she didn't see this in her sink!
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899794/img/12899794.jpg

But, I think it was this that she smelled, in the end:
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899805/img/12899805.jpg

Luckily, I learned my lesson and did the gasoline and 28%
muriatic acid experiments OUTSIDE!
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898627/img/12898627.jpg
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-13 20:15:21 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> On Mon, 13 May 2013 12:41:56 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
>
>> I doubt you can soak a plastic peanut butter container in
>> gasoline and then clean it so perfectly that I can't detect it.
>
> This may be very true as my wife can smell the essence of
> what I've been doing even days afterward!
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898702/img/12898702.jpg
>
> In fact, she had arrived home *after* my experiment had concluded:
> http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/12893328/img/12893328.jpg
>
> But, she still knew *something* was up by the odd essence of
> distillate she caught, even though all the windows were open.
>
> She inquired as to whether I was "up to something" again in
> "her" kitchen! Little did she know that prior, her sink had:
>
> MAF cleaner:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899731/img/12899731.jpg
>
> Brake cleaner:
> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899695/img/12899695.jpg
>
> Engine degreaser: <=== this, I think, is what she smelled!
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899744/img/12899744.jpg
>
> Paint thinner:
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899756/img/12899756.jpg
>
> WD-40:
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899764/img/12899764.jpg
>
> Acetone:
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899769/img/12899769.jpg
>
> TSP:
> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899780/img/12899780.jpg
>
> Isopropyl alcohol:
> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899750/img/12899750.jpg
>
> Good thing she didn't see this in her sink!
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899794/img/12899794.jpg
>
> But, I think it was this that she smelled, in the end:
> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12899805/img/12899805.jpg
>
> Luckily, I learned my lesson and did the gasoline and 28%
> muriatic acid experiments OUTSIDE!
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12898627/img/12898627.jpg

You did all that in your kitchen sink? And your wife is a "Super Sniffer"?

I'd say you're lucky if you sleep in your own bed tonight!

You need to get one of those solvent sink contraptions that auto mechanics
use to clean up dirty parts. And BTW, don't install it in your kitchen. ;-)

MartyB
Danny D
2013-05-13 23:35:28 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 May 2013 15:15:21 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

> You did all that in your kitchen sink?

Well, actually, I was experimenting in 'her' kitchen sink.

> you're lucky if you sleep in your own bed tonight

I've always been a little insensitive to pain and irritants ...
Jim Elbrecht
2013-05-14 11:01:47 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
-snip-
>
>She inquired as to whether I was "up to something" again in
>"her" kitchen! Little did she know that prior, her sink had:

Uh, Danny-- You don't need help with cleaning labels, trimming
bushes or building pool poles.

this is the most valuable advice you'll ever get on Usenet-
"Quit using the kitchen sink [that your wife views as *hers*] for
science experiments!"

Put one of these in the basement or garage--
http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-6762/Detail

A $30 slop sink can save your marriage-- or your life!

Plumbing it will make it better-- but a bucket or two will make it
functional.

Jim
Danny D
2013-05-14 14:43:55 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 May 2013 07:01:47 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

> A $30 slop sink can save your marriage-- or your life!

Well, there *is* that type of slop sink, in "her" laundry room!

:)
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-14 19:42:10 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> On Tue, 14 May 2013 07:01:47 -0400, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
>
>> A $30 slop sink can save your marriage-- or your life!
>
> Well, there *is* that type of slop sink, in "her" laundry room!
>
> :)

Be wise and avoid that too. Git yer own sink!
The Real Bev
2013-05-15 02:19:19 UTC
Permalink
On 05/12/2013 07:05 PM, Danny D wrote:

> On Sun, 12 May 2013 21:42:24 +0000, John Weiss wrote:
>
>> Try Goo Gone or Goof Off or similar product made especially
>> for dissolving gummy things.
>
> We looked up the main ingredient in the Goo dissolvers; they
> appear to be 95% petroleum distillates.
>
> We tested a few petroleum distillates, such as carb cleaner,
> MAF cleaner, paint thinner, engine degreaser, etc., but what
> worked fastest and easiest was plain old California gasoline.
>
> In fact, I tried a new technique today, which was to put the
> plastic jars inside a mixed-nuts container from Costco, and
> shook it for about 10 seconds; then washed it off.
> http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12918691/img/12918691.jpg
>
> Worked like a charm!

As long as there's a remnant of the glue the jar remains sticky and
unusable, and that sure looks like glue on the mixed-nuts container.
There's a limit to how much effort and chemical I'm willing to expend
just to remove a label.

--
Cheers, Bev
===================================================
Salesmen welcome -- dog food is expensive
Danny D.
2013-05-15 03:11:37 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 14 May 2013 19:19:19 -0700, The Real Bev wrote:

> There's a limit to how much effort and chemical I'm willing
> to expend just to remove a label.

Understood.

That's why I was looking for the easiest "magic" solution.
d***@gmail.com
2013-05-13 20:11:43 UTC
Permalink
On Thursday, May 9, 2013 1:32:01 PM UTC-4, Danny D wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?

Why is everything a crisis with you?
Danny D
2013-05-13 23:38:42 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 13 May 2013 13:11:43 -0700, dennisgauge wrote:

> Why is everything a crisis with you?

You mistake curiosity and enlightenment for a 'crisis'?

I could just as innocently ask why you aren't interested
in running some experiments yourself and furthering
your collective knowledge on a variety of things.

There's nothing wrong with asking, and learning from
the responses - and - most importantly - receiving the
knowledge learned from years of experience from those
who helpfully populate this a.h.r venue.
Jack Myers
2013-05-16 22:02:42 UTC
Permalink
In alt.home.repair Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:
> Just curious, as my current 'magic solution' is water - but maybe
> there is a better medium for dissolving glued paper labels on
> glass bottles for kitchen reuse?

Has anyone mentioned baking soda yet? Home brewers use it to lift labels
off of beer bottles.

--
Jack Myers / Westminster, California, USA

perhaps there is a certain element of the lumpen literati that is so dogmatically atheist and materialist and Earth-bound that it finds the grandeur of space and the myriad mysteries of cosmic intelligence anathema
--Stanley Kubric
Danny D.
2013-05-17 07:36:41 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 16 May 2013 15:02:42 -0700, Jack Myers wrote:

> Has anyone mentioned baking soda yet? Home brewers use it to lift labels
> off of beer bottles.

I'll try the baking soda for the next plastic vitamin bottle, as the glue
on them is the hardest yet (although the gasoline has no problem with
it).
Danny D
2013-05-22 05:28:48 UTC
Permalink
The kids used up another plastic gummy vitamins jar today:
http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127024/img/13127024.jpg

But, this Costco vitamin jar was taller than the Costco
mixed-nuts jar that I had used before (still had gas):
http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127025/img/13127025.jpg

So, used a taller Costco red-capped peanut jar, with the
result that the label came clean off:
http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127028/img/13127028.jpg

The label peeled off like peeling the skin off an orange after
only a few minutes in the gasoline:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127027/img/13127027.jpg

Unless there's some negative effect, I'd say gasoline is close
to a magic solution for removing stubborn labels from jars:
a) It's cheap
b) It's readily available
c) It works in seconds
d) It's easily washed off
e) It's so volatile, it doesn't even have to be washed off
f) It's not any more or less toxic than the recommended goo stuff
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-22 16:12:59 UTC
Permalink
"Danny D" <***@example.com> wrote in message
news:knhl2g$f7$***@speranza.aioe.org...
> The kids used up another plastic gummy vitamins jar today:
> http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127024/img/13127024.jpg
>
> But, this Costco vitamin jar was taller than the Costco
> mixed-nuts jar that I had used before (still had gas):
> http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127025/img/13127025.jpg
>
> So, used a taller Costco red-capped peanut jar, with the
> result that the label came clean off:
> http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127028/img/13127028.jpg
>
> The label peeled off like peeling the skin off an orange after
> only a few minutes in the gasoline:
> http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/13127027/img/13127027.jpg
>
> Unless there's some negative effect, I'd say gasoline is close
> to a magic solution for removing stubborn labels from jars:
> a) It's cheap
> b) It's readily available
> c) It works in seconds
> d) It's easily washed off
> e) It's so volatile, it doesn't even have to be washed off
> f) It's not any more or less toxic than the recommended goo stuff

I'd like to see authoritative cites supporting d, e, and f.
>
>
Danny D
2013-05-23 09:27:56 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 22 May 2013 11:12:59 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:

>> d) It's easily washed off
>> e) It's so volatile, it doesn't even have to be washed off
>> f) It's not any more or less toxic than the recommended goo stuff
>
> I'd like to see authoritative cites supporting d, e, and f.

Let's take f, the reputed toxicity factor:

Googling for gasoline toxicity, I find this from NIH:
Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1520023/
And this, from the CDC:
Medical Management Guidelines for Gasoline
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mmg/mmg.asp?id=465&tid=83
And this from the Canadian OSHA:
What are the potential health effects of gasoline?
http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/chem_profiles/gasoline.html

They all say gasoline is not all that dangerous, even taken internally!

In fact, even if you drank the stuff straight out of the gas can, they
all say the major danger is aspiration into your lungs with pneumonia
being the largest danger from drinking the stuff.

They all end with a similar sentence as this by NIH verbatim below:
"No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course
of using automotive fuels."

BTW, those of you who think petroleum distillates horrid, think about
what Vaseline is made up of. Or laxatives. Or many skin lotions. Or,
more apropos, Goo Gone, which is advertised for removing the labels
on bottles used in the kitchen. Read the MSDS (hint: It's 95% petroleum
distillates).

If you don't think you use petroleum distillates every day, then
think again.

NOTE: I'm not saying gasoline has no effects ... there are possible
carcinogenic and irritant effects - but we're not talking anywhere
near orders of magnitudes of the levels and time frames for that to
occur from peeling the external labels off of closed vitamin jars.
Gary
2013-05-23 12:02:55 UTC
Permalink
Danny D wrote:
>
> They all say gasoline is not all that dangerous, even taken internally!
>
> In fact, even if you drank the stuff straight out of the gas can, they
> all say the major danger is aspiration into your lungs with pneumonia
> being the largest danger from drinking the stuff.

You first, dumbass. You drink a glass of gasoline, I seriously doubt you'll
have to worry about getting pneumonia.

G.
k***@attt.bizz
2013-05-23 13:09:47 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 23 May 2013 09:27:56 +0000 (UTC), Danny D <***@example.com>
wrote:

>On Wed, 22 May 2013 11:12:59 -0500, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
>
>>> d) It's easily washed off
>>> e) It's so volatile, it doesn't even have to be washed off
>>> f) It's not any more or less toxic than the recommended goo stuff
>>
>> I'd like to see authoritative cites supporting d, e, and f.
>
>Let's take f, the reputed toxicity factor:
>
>Googling for gasoline toxicity, I find this from NIH:
> Acute toxicity of gasoline and some additives.
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1520023/
>And this, from the CDC:
> Medical Management Guidelines for Gasoline
> http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/mmg/mmg.asp?id=465&tid=83
>And this from the Canadian OSHA:
> What are the potential health effects of gasoline?
> http://www.ccohs.ca/oshanswers/chemicals/chem_profiles/gasoline.html
>
>They all say gasoline is not all that dangerous, even taken internally!
>
>In fact, even if you drank the stuff straight out of the gas can, they
>all say the major danger is aspiration into your lungs with pneumonia
>being the largest danger from drinking the stuff.
>
>They all end with a similar sentence as this by NIH verbatim below:
> "No acute toxic health effects would occur during the normal course
> of using automotive fuels."

In "the normal course of using automotive fuels", I don't drink them.
Perhaps you do?

>BTW, those of you who think petroleum distillates horrid, think about
>what Vaseline is made up of. Or laxatives. Or many skin lotions. Or,
>more apropos, Goo Gone, which is advertised for removing the labels
>on bottles used in the kitchen. Read the MSDS (hint: It's 95% petroleum
>distillates).

Not all petroleum distillates are created equally. You drink Benzene.
BTW, the LD50 numbers for gasoline seem to be in the 2-5g/kg range.
Not terrible but I'll let your drink the stuff.


>If you don't think you use petroleum distillates every day, then
>think again.

So what? You ingest the most dangerous chemical on the planet every
day, too. That statement alone is meaningless.

>NOTE: I'm not saying gasoline has no effects ... there are possible
>carcinogenic and irritant effects - but we're not talking anywhere
>near orders of magnitudes of the levels and time frames for that to
>occur from peeling the external labels off of closed vitamin jars.

Your logic is amazing.
Nunya Bidnits
2013-05-23 15:32:48 UTC
Permalink
Danny D <***@example.com> wrote:

clipall

FYI, the crossposts you see here were deleted..My further responses to your
posts are on RFC only so the many who filter out crossposts can see the
thread.
Bill
2013-05-25 16:26:41 UTC
Permalink
Yes...

Some labels easily peel off. If not...

BBQ Lighter fluid.

Or Rubbing alcohol.

Or WD-40.
ktos
2013-05-22 20:45:41 UTC
Permalink
Yes.
Danny D
2013-05-23 09:28:52 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 22 May 2013 20:45:41 +0000, ktos wrote:

> Yes.

The answer turns out to be:

Q: Is there?
A: Yes.

Q: What?
A: Petroleum distillates.
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